Basement Drain Tile Questions

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mugatu300

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Hello, I have some questions regarding the drain tile system installed in my basement. I've owned the house for 4 years now. For the first 1.5 years there were no issues but since then see below.

mugatu-01.jpg


Issue #1: I am getting water leakage where the cinderblock wall meets the floor in several areas. The current drain tile system was purchased by previous homeowner. I have had professionals come investigate and they all have stated that I need a entire new system. They have stated that my current system is too far away from the wall in some areas (12"-20" in some spots) and that the pipe used is not good (black corrugated with fabric lining). They said there is no way for the ground water to get into the drain tile and hence the leaking. That said, I do see some water draining from the tile into the sump pump pits so Im not sure how accurate their statements are.

Is it possible my drain tile is just clogged and I can have it snaked out? There is a lot of gunk visible in the pipe where it drains into the sump pit

Is there anything else I can do for the leaking (i.e. apply waterproofing, hydraulic cement, etc.)?

Issue #2: Also, there is a mysterious off-shoot area with a grate. If I look inside the grate, I can see standing water. I cannot remove the grate without breaking it. This area always looks damp. All the professionals who have looked at this are at a loss for words. Any ideas?

Thank you all in advance very much!
 
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WorthFlorida

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The best way is a drain system from the outside but it will be expensive but it will work near 100%. What the "professionals" stated looks accurate. My question would be, water that builds up on the outside of the wall, how can the water percolate under the footing? The drain pipe will have to be well below the footing.
 

John Gayewski

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I'm guessing they had to go farther from the wall due to a footing.

They make a system for this that is basically a trench drain for the entire perimeter of the concrete floor. It's a lot of work. Better it goes outside.
 

mugatu300

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The best way is a drain system from the outside but it will be expensive but it will work near 100%. What the "professionals" stated looks accurate. My question would be, water that builds up on the outside of the wall, how can the water percolate under the footing? The drain pipe will have to be well below the footing.
I understand but an outside system is quite a bit above my budget. Do you think snaking my current system may do anything to help?
 

mugatu300

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I'm guessing they had to go farther from the wall due to a footing.

They make a system for this that is basically a trench drain for the entire perimeter of the concrete floor. It's a lot of work. Better it goes outside.
Thanks for the reply. Do you have any idea what they mysterious section is?
 

Tughillrzr

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Thanks for the reply. Do you have any idea what they mysterious section is?
Possibly an added floor drain ? if you flush floor drain w hose does water go into sump basin? Trench /drain tile was done wrong and with inferior products. Maybe original installer wasn’t well versed in drainage. Wondering why you have three outlets in basin ?
 

mugatu300

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I'm guessing they had to go farther from the wall due to a footing.

They make a system for this that is basically a trench drain for the entire perimeter of the concrete floor. It's a lot of work. Better it goes outside.
As far as outside, are you referring to an exterior french drain? If so, how deep does that have to be dug? I've seen some diagrams says 18" and others that go down to the basement floor (in my case that would be like 10 feet below soil).
 

mugatu300

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The best way is a drain system from the outside but it will be expensive but it will work near 100%. What the "professionals" stated looks accurate. My question would be, water that builds up on the outside of the wall, how can the water percolate under the footing? The drain pipe will have to be well below the footing.
As far as outside, are you referring to an exterior french drain? If so, how deep does that have to be dug? I've seen some diagrams says 18" and others that go down to the basement floor (in my case that would be like 10 feet below soil).
 

John Gayewski

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As far as outside, are you referring to an exterior french drain? If so, how deep does that have to be dug? I've seen some diagrams says 18" and others that go down to the basement floor (in my case that would be like 10 feet below soil).
I guess it would depend on where the water is coming from. If its ground water coming in from deep then it would need to be deep. If it's water that runs down the walls from your gutters then shallow would probably be ok.
 

WorthFlorida

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John is correct in his statement. In an idea world a french drain at the base of the footing is the best way. I had a home built in Cicero, NY with a basement. That area has a very high water table an only a mile from Oneida Lake. In addition to the french drain, there was about 6" of stone and drain pipe under the basement floor all leadings to the sump pump. The floor was poured with a 2x4 along the basement walls. Afterwards the 2x4's were pulled, therefore creating a floating floor. Any hydro static pressure under the floor would not push up on the slab that could cause lifting and cracking thus water in the basement. Three things that are critical with home with basements, roof, foundation & walls, and a dry basement.
 
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