Base for jet pump

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Learner

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The cottage I bought a last summer has a jet pump to bring water from the lake. The pump and pressure tank are off level and sitting on a broken concrete paver, so I intend to replace the base to make it level and to take the strain off the water lines. I am soliciting comments on my plan and inviting better ideas.

The cottage is on piers and the pump & pressure tank are underneath the cottage on the broken paver, which rests on the dirt.. The ground is granite covered with maybe 2-10 inches of soil, which washes down the hillside under the cottage. In the attached photo, the concrete behind the pump is the base of a stone fireplace and to the left and right is wooden lattice skirting around the base of the cottage.

I thought I could remove the dirt down to the granite, build a frame with pressure treated lumber or plastic wood and put it on the granite, then fill it with gravel. I would bolt the pump to a base (pressure treated plywood?) which would float on the gravel.

Any critiques or suggestions will be welcome.

overview - smaller.jpg
 

Banjo Bud

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If you’re going to dig down to the granite, I’d refill with concrete all the way to the height you need. Even if it’s 10”-12” thick. I wouldn’t use pressure treated or plastic wood. Concrete would be really solid and last a lifetime. I don’t think you’d ever have any regrets with concrete. Make sure you use concrete wire mesh. If it’s 12” thick, you’d want 2-3 layers of it 3-4” apart through the height. Like one layer at 3”, the next at 6-7”, the next at 9-10”. That way, even if the concrete cracks, it won’t separate or move. Rebar would be ok but isn’t necessary, just the mesh. Just my 2 cents.
 
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LLigetfa

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Use an air conditioner wall bracket, heavy duty shelf bracket, or DIY bracket made from PT wood and bolt it to the wall with tapcon screws.
 

Learner

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If you’re going to dig down to the granite, I’d refill with concrete all the way to the height you need. Even if it’s 10”-12” thick. I wouldn’t use pressure treated or plastic wood. Concrete would be really solid and last a lifetime. I don’t think you’d ever have any regrets with concrete. Make sure you use concrete wire mesh. If it’s 12” thick, you’d want 2-3 layers of it 3-4” apart through the height. Like one layer at 3”, the next at 6-7”, the next at 9-10”. That way, even if the concrete cracks, it won’t separate or move. Rebar would be ok but isn’t necessary, just the mesh. Just my 2 cents.
Hey, thanks for the detailed advice on the mesh.
 

Learner

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Use an air conditioner wall bracket, heavy duty shelf bracket, or DIY bracket made from PT wood and bolt it to the wall with tapcon screws.
That solution had not occurred to me. I thought about, and rejected, the idea of hanging it from the floor joists because of obstructions and noise / vibration. I'll think about attaching to the concrete base. Thanks for the idea!
 
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