Bad well pump

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Reach4

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Got it.
So I expect the float switch is in series with one of the hots on the way to the control box.

So measure the voltage between L1 and L2 on the control box.
 

KineticoUser

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OK, here are the readings. L1 is 122VAC, L2 is 122VAC and L1-L2 is 240VAC . Power going to each of the yellow, black and red pump motor leads is 122VAC. Amps are as following: Out to motor -- Yellow .007A, Black .004 - .001A, Red .002A; In -- L1 .004A, L2 .004A.
In addition, resistance is as follows: yellow-black = 3.2 ohms, yellow-red = 11.8 ohms. None of the lines are grounded. The pump sits 282' below ground level.
 

Reach4

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Measure voltage Yellow to Black. If that is about 240vac, then the problem is beyond there-- wiring or pump.
 

Reach4

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Glad to see your well system is working.
 

KineticoUser

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Measure voltage Yellow to Black. If that is about 240vac, then the problem is beyond there-- wiring or pump.
Actually, though the Pump Saver showed it was working, it wasn't. I learned the only way to know it isn't working is if the pump won't pump. After replacing the $300 Pump Saver, all works fine. Can you imagine $300 for a little 2" X 3" box? I was told well pumps last about 7-8 years with our conditions, so having ideal amps on a 17 year old pump is great.
 

Valveman

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Actually, though the Pump Saver showed it was working, it wasn't. I learned the only way to know it isn't working is if the pump won't pump. After replacing the $300 Pump Saver, all works fine. Can you imagine $300 for a little 2" X 3" box? I was told well pumps last about 7-8 years with our conditions, so having ideal amps on a 17 year old pump is great.
It still doesn't make sense that you had 240V going down to the motor but was drawing no amperage? Pump saver would have stopped voltage from going down the well.
 

KineticoUser

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It still doesn't make sense that you had 240V going down to the motor but was drawing no amperage? Pump saver would have stopped voltage from going down the well.
L1-L2 gave me 240VAC. On the lines heading down to the pump, I was reading resistance... making sure the connections weren't broken. Though power was available to the motor lines, the Pump Saver prevented it from running. I can't say exactly what the problem was, but everything worked fine when the Pump Saver was replaced.
 

Reach4

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L1-L2 gave me 240VAC. On the lines heading down to the pump, I was reading resistance... making sure the connections weren't broken. Though power was available to the motor lines, the Pump Saver prevented it from running. I can't say exactly what the problem was, but everything worked fine when the Pump Saver was replaced.
Was that 240 vac measured when the pump wires were connected? I suspect not.
 

KineticoUser

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Was that 240 vac measured when the pump wires were connected? I suspect not.
I took the readings with everything disconnected. I'm glad I didn't have to replace the pump. It will be nice having two wells to pull water from to fill my new tank next Monday.
 
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