Align Sink Drain with P-trap?

Users who are viewing this thread

DanaG

New Member
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Ontario, Canada
I'm trying to replace a bathroom sink, but the new sink's drain no longer aligns with the p trap. (See attached picture) The pipes are off by about 1.5". Just wondering if there are any easy fixes here to re align?
Very much a novice DIYer so any input is appreciated!

197DBD33-F89B-4BCB-9A78-3FA663655B85.png
 
Last edited by a moderator:

wwhitney

In the Trades
Messages
6,605
Reaction score
1,859
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
What you need to do is rotate the trap a little and shorten the trap arm a little. That will bring the trap inlet inline with the sink tailpiece. The picture shows the slip joint connection within the trap that will let you rotate the j-bend portion of the trap.

Because of the angle, I can't make out what is happening on the trap arm. Usually there's another slip joint connection there. In which case you can shorten the horizontal projection by pushing more of the trap arm into the slip joint connection. You do need to be sure not to push too much in, you could in theory block the fitting in the wall. But if you push it in as far as it goes, and then pull it out at least 2", that should be fine.

If there's no slip joint connection on your trap arm, please post another photo that show the whole length of the pipe from the trap to the wall.

Cheers, Wayne
 

DanaG

New Member
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Ontario, Canada
What you need to do is rotate the trap a little and shorten the trap arm a little. That will bring the trap inlet inline with the sink tailpiece. The picture shows the slip joint connection within the trap that will let you rotate the j-bend portion of the trap.

Because of the angle, I can't make out what is happening on the trap arm. Usually there's another slip joint connection there. In which case you can shorten the horizontal projection by pushing more of the trap arm into the slip joint connection. You do need to be sure not to push too much in, you could in theory block the fitting in the wall. But if you push it in as far as it goes, and then pull it out at least 2", that should be fine.

If there's no slip joint connection on your trap arm, please post another photo that show the whole length of the pipe from the trap to the wall.

Cheers, Wayne
Thanks for the response Wayne! The trap rotates but there's no slip joint connection on the arm. The attached picture shows the wall pipe a little more. Let me know if you have any tips!

2ACF180B-FB85-448B-8EFE-6CBF1AB03619.png
 
Last edited by a moderator:

wwhitney

In the Trades
Messages
6,605
Reaction score
1,859
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
I can't figure out what is going on with that trap arm where the diameter gets bigger. Normally that juncture would have a slip joint nut and be a slip joint connection.

My experience is limited, maybe one of the plumbers here will recognize what the picture shows. Peering into the hole on the wall could also be informative, but obviously very difficult to take a picture of.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Weekend Handyman

Active Member
Messages
437
Reaction score
131
Points
43
Location
Nova Scotia
I can't figure out what is going on with that trap arm where the diameter gets bigger. Normally that juncture would have a slip joint nut and be a slip joint connection.

My experience is limited, maybe one of the plumbers here will recognize what the picture shows. Peering into the hole on the wall could also be informative, but obviously very difficult to take a picture of.

Cheers, Wayne

I am not a plumber. It looks like it is a soldered in copper drain.
 

wwhitney

In the Trades
Messages
6,605
Reaction score
1,859
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
I am not a plumber. It looks like it is a soldered in copper drain.
Well, that would certainly make shortening the trap arm difficult. That could be confirmed by scuffing the rear larger diameter portion to see if it is copper colored. Maybe the lighting in the photograph just makes it look grey.

Cheers, Wayne
 

John Gayewski

In the Trades
Messages
4,443
Reaction score
1,391
Points
113
Location
Iowa
Yes it's soldered. You need to unsweat it at the copper connection and solder a trap adapter. I've seen this a lot and most dummies will find a fernco that really doesn't fit and tighten it to the tubes. Horrible.
 

wwhitney

In the Trades
Messages
6,605
Reaction score
1,859
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
Yes! I wasn't sure how to explain this, but it is soldered into a copper pipe.
I don't know how I'd go about shortening it. Maybe best to get a plumber in for this one?
Yes, unless you're proficient with soldering. I'm curious what size the larger diameter pipe is (I assume the trap is a 1-1/4" tubular trap?), and what the next connection downstream looks like. If the

On the off chance there's a slip joint connection in the wall (not very likely, and would only make sense if the larger diameter pipe is in fact 1-1/2" tubular (exact 1-1/2" OD)), you could open up the wall a little to get access to it.

Cheers, Wayne
 

wwhitney

In the Trades
Messages
6,605
Reaction score
1,859
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
Yes it's soldered. You need to unsweat it at the copper connection and solder a trap adapter. I've seen this a lot
But what is it soldered to? 1-1/4" copper DWV (1-3/8" OD)? If so, soldering in a trap adapter makes a lot of sense, and is what they should have done originally.

Cheers, Wayne
 

John Gayewski

In the Trades
Messages
4,443
Reaction score
1,391
Points
113
Location
Iowa
But what is it soldered to? 1-1/4" copper DWV (1-3/8" OD)? If so, soldering in a trap adapter makes a lot of sense, and is what they should have done originally.

Cheers, Wayne
Yes it's soldered into a copper santee in the wall. It was a trend for a while apparently.
 

wwhitney

In the Trades
Messages
6,605
Reaction score
1,859
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
Yes it's soldered into a copper santee in the wall. It was a trend for a while apparently.
I was asking about what the 1-1/4" tubular is soldered to. Since the diameter is so close, I guess it must be 1-1/4" DWV pipe. The ID (1.295") just happens to be enough that 1-1/4" tubular has the right gap for a solder connection?

Cheers, Wayne
 

John Gayewski

In the Trades
Messages
4,443
Reaction score
1,391
Points
113
Location
Iowa
I was asking about what the 1-1/4" tubular is soldered to. Since the diameter is so close, I guess it must be 1-1/4" DWV pipe. The ID (1.295") just happens to be enough that 1-1/4" tubular has the right gap for a solder connection?

Cheers, Wayne
I assume a regular slip tube extension. I haven't done a lot of investigation. I usually just roll my eyes and fix it. An older plumber might know exactly. A modern slip tube extension would have threads. Maybe they cut them off
 

wwhitney

In the Trades
Messages
6,605
Reaction score
1,859
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
I assume a regular slip tube extension.
If it were a regular 1-1/4" tubular extension, soldered instead of slip joint, then we should see the diameter neck back down to 1-1/4", which I'm not seeing. And there would still need to be a trap adapter between that and the assumed san-tee in the wall.

So I'm liking the idea they stubbed 1-1/4" copper DWV out of the wall and just soldered the tubular to it instead of using a trap adapter.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Reach4

Well-Known Member
Messages
38,982
Reaction score
4,473
Points
113
Location
IL
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks