Adding inline filter between water heater and humidifier?

Discussion in 'HVAC Heating & Cooling' started by Wade Lippman, Nov 6, 2015.

  1. Wade Lippman

    Wade Lippman New Member

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    Jan 4, 2015
    Location:
    New York
    The last two years my Honeywell humidifier hasn't worked because the tiny filter and even tinier orifice were clogged. I thought I would add an inline polypropylene filter between the water heater and the humidifier, hoping I could avoid the constant clogging.

    I got a Hydronix ISF2512, but noticed that it says maximum is 100*. The water from the water heater will be hotter than that. Can I use this filter? If not is there one that is good for hot water?

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  2. Smooky

    Smooky In the Trades

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  4. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

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    Sep 25, 2013
    Location:
    IL
    I suspect that if you had softened water the clogging problem would go away.

    Is your humidifier one that drains some water regularly, or one that only receives but does not drain water.
     
  5. Wade Lippman

    Wade Lippman New Member

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    Jan 4, 2015
    Location:
    New York
    There is a steady flow through the drain when it is working.
    My old house never clogged in 25 years, but it was an Aprilaire.
     
  6. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

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    Did your old house have softer water?
     
  7. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    Retired Systems engineer for defense industry.
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    New England
    While the need for a humidifier tends to be an indicator of other functional problems in the house, I have one in my condo. It's an AprilAire that uses a flow-through design, with any excess going down the drain. At the end of the season, the entire evaporative panel is coated with mineral deposits, but it's never clogged.

    Some installation instructions specify hot water, but I've never had issues just running it from the cold supply with no water softener.
     
  8. Wade Lippman

    Wade Lippman New Member

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    New York
    I don't think so. Both houses had water supplies from NY finger lakes, but different lakes. They ought to be similar.
     
  9. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

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    Sep 25, 2013
    Location:
    IL
    Check your aerators. If they have junk, I would consider adding a whole house cartridge filter.

    I would flush my water heater anyway.
     
  10. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    It's not clear if you're dealing with sediment in the water (unlikely on a public water supply) or a mineral buildup from minerals dissolved in the water that precipitated out during evaporation (much more likely). Both can clog up a nozzle, but only sediment can be filtered out, the other requires a water softener to remove those minerals. Any minerals in the water will be left behind when the water evaporates. Those can clog all sorts of things.
     
  11. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2004
    Occupation:
    Retired Systems engineer for defense industry.
    Location:
    New England
    It's not clear if you're dealing with sediment in the water (unlikely on a public water supply) or a mineral buildup from minerals dissolved in the water that precipitated out during evaporation (much more likely). Both can clog up a nozzle, but only sediment can be filtered out, the other requires a water softener to remove those minerals. Any minerals in the water will be left behind when the water evaporates. Those can clog all sorts of things.

    Some designs of humidifier work better than others, minimizing issues with their deposits. The only way around that is to use distilled water (softened water has fewer minerals than unsoftened water - true distilled water has none). Using hot water means it will evaporate quicker, and if it has minerals in it, leave them behind, possibly at an inappropriate place.
     
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