90 vent elbow with long street tail.

Users who are viewing this thread

Clutchcargo

Member
Messages
33
Reaction score
5
Points
8
Location
USA
Is there such a thing as a 90 street with a long street tail? This is for a 2"vent going thru a 2x4 top plate. My issue is that I've only got about 1.25" of available pitch between the top of the top plate of the shower's partition wall and the highest possible location of an inverted sanitary tee at the top of the stack. The stack is 5' away. I need this 90 to be as low as possible and I'd rather not hog out a 3" hole in a 2x4 top plate to accomodate a fitting's hub.
I'm in tight quarters and as soon as this vent gets above the top plate of the shower partition wall, I need to turn horizontal immediately in order to keep it pitched toward the drain side. Another option is to run it high between the ceiling joists and pitch the vent toward the stack. Is that option acceptable?
TIA
 

Clutchcargo

Member
Messages
33
Reaction score
5
Points
8
Location
USA
Wow, I was nervous with 2.5" hole. No issues leaving just 5/16" of meat on each side?
 

wwhitney

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,057
Reaction score
1,267
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
I'd rather not hog out a 3" hole in a 2x4 top plate to accommodate a fitting's hub.
For a load bearing wall, you'd need to strap the top plate across the hole whenever it's wider than 1.75". And if you like, you can drill the larger diameter through the topmost 1", with a smaller diameter through the rest of the plate (and the lower plate if doubled).

Another option is to run it high between the ceiling joists and pitch the vent toward the stack. Is that option acceptable?
The IPC allows that, what plumbing code are you under?

Cheers, Wayne
 

Clutchcargo

Member
Messages
33
Reaction score
5
Points
8
Location
USA
Its not plumbing code, its building code for notches and holes.
I'm sure that even 2.5" isn't allowed. I'll add some bracing and go for it. This is a shower wall and I want to make sure it stays as stiff as possible.
Edit: The biggest hole for a non-load bearing is 60% of the framing size, in this case 2.1".
 
Last edited:

Terry

The Plumbing Wizard
Staff member
Messages
28,875
Reaction score
2,883
Points
113
Location
Bothell, Washington
Website
terrylove.com
Gee Whiz, I guess those hundreds of homes I plumbed didn't pass a framing inspection?
How about the homes I was building? They didn't pass either? There were times I was plumbing five three bath homes a week.

15243-sun-design-41.jpg


A home I designed and built.

15243-sun-design-34.jpg


15243-sun-design-44.jpg


And plumbed. That's me on the ladder.
 

Clutchcargo

Member
Messages
33
Reaction score
5
Points
8
Location
USA
I wouldn't draw attention to it. There's probably something in the ibc that I'm missing.
Very nice house.
 

Terry

The Plumbing Wizard
Staff member
Messages
28,875
Reaction score
2,883
Points
113
Location
Bothell, Washington
Website
terrylove.com
I was getting five home inspections a week. The inspectors loved my work.
The framers would ask why the other plumbers didn't lay out the plumbing the way I did. I made their jobs easier.
Very early on in my plumbing career, I would get asked by my supervisors how I would lay out a job that they had worries about. I wasn't going to be doing that job, there were 150 of us working there, but he did know that I knew my stuff and wanted to pass on the information.
A 164 unit condo project in Federal Way, with 20 buildings. The contractor would get together with my and the head framer and ask how we would handle certain things. "I don't understand what the plumber is saying, but just do whatever he says."
Also on that project, the inspector would come by for the inspection, ask if I had plumbed it, and then without leaving his car, sign the permit.
I have never had a problem with inspections.
 

wwhitney

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,057
Reaction score
1,267
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
Impressive.

At least these days, the IRC requires a reinforcing metal strap for any top plate in a load bearing wall that has less than 50% of its cross-sectional width intact. There's an exception for walls that are fully sheathed with plywood on one side, where the plywood can provide the necessary reinforcement.

https://up.codes/viewer/washington/wa-residential-code-2018/chapter/6/wall-construction#R602.6.1

But if you run the DWV in non load bearing walls, no requirement.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Jeff H Young

In the Trades
Messages
4,784
Reaction score
1,046
Points
113
Location
92346
I'm sure too what I did 30 years ago might not fly with a inspector that's by the book. proper straps should take care of it though
I like Terry's way to use a 2 7/8 bit on the top plate to allow hub to fit I always had to sawsall the top plate and the bottom was just drilled but that a cleaner way basically the top is destroyed even with the 2 7/8 hole but the strap fixes that.
 

Clutchcargo

Member
Messages
33
Reaction score
5
Points
8
Location
USA
Here's where I landed.
For the vent, I started with a 3" hole drilled through the blocking and then down about 3/4" into the top plate, then finished up the hole with 2.5". This gave the vent 90's hub room to sit low.
Then I added a X-brace to make sure that this wall doesn't have any opportunity to move. I'm going to be putting a swinging shower door perpendicular to the triple studs on the right. Still need to add some nail guards.
Hindsight 20/20, probably just some plywood spanning the blocking between the joists would have been fine.

PXL_20211220_210754721.jpg


I build my partition walls with blocking between the studs instead of a double top plate; keeps the studs straighter.
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks