Re: Consumer product reviews of the American Standard Champion toilet
Posted by Al L on January 20, 2004 at 14:55:11:
In response to Re: Consumer product reviews of the American Standard Champion toilet
Unfortunately I don't know of any American Standard Champion toilet that doesn't have a leaky flush valve. It seems that America's best flushing system is also best at leaking. Cleaning the seal may slow the leak down but probably won�t stop it completely. The seal material is very sticky and may have debris stuck to it from the manufacturing process. You might also try adding weight to the tower by tying fishing line with clamp on weights around the tower where it necks down. (The weights didn�t work for me.) I believe the flush tower design is flawed. The flush tower has a parting line (from injection molding process) that leaves a ridge of plastic in the area where the seal contacts the tower. It's kind of like putting a toothpick under a sheet of paper and expecting to be able to press the paper flat. Another problem seems to be that the tower or flush valve seat may be wavy and the silicone seal can't conform to the non-uniformity. Unfortunately you can't just go out and buy a flapper to replace the tower. I've been wondering if a Toto Drake flapper assembly would work. I think they are both 3", but I don't know if the tank hole is the same size and if the tank to bowl gasket would still work. I have devised a solution to the constant running. Cut a piece of wood or plastic stock (an old paint stir or piece of narrow wood trim works fine) about 7 3/16 long. It should be long enough so that you bow it to install it, and friction holds it in place. Drill a small hole through it 3" from one end. Put the wood piece in the tank so the small hole is directly over the rod that connects to the fill valve. The wood piece needs to be installed at the very top of the tank and with enough bow to prevent interference with the fill valve arm. Make a small loop in a piece of monofilament fishing line and slip it over the bottom of the rod that connects to the fill valve arm. Feed the other end of the line up through the hole and over the front edge of the tank. Attach the end of the line to the bottom of the toilet lid on the left side about 1" away from the centerline of the hinge. The electrical department in your local home center should have a thin fastener with double sided adhesive that you can stick on the bottom of the toilet lid and attach the monofilament line to. Check for proper operation before securing the line. When you open the lid the line goes slack and allows the tank to fill. When you close the lid, the line pulls the fill valve to it�s closed position. Don�t make the line too tight or you could damage the fill valve. Al L