Re: septic system
Posted by kristine on April 15, 19100 at 17:01:39:
In response to Re: septic system
:
: : Debbie: A sand filter system is used generally where the lay of the land does not lend itself to the typical drain field installation. In some cases it is used if the ground percolation characteristics are less than suitable.
: : The key to its operation is in that a large hole is excavated 8'-10' deep and a open bottomed reinforced masonry box is constructed (like the basement and foundation for a small house, but without any floor.) This box typically extends 6 or 8 feet above grade and is filled with coarse builders sand. The liquid portion of the sanitary effluent from the septic tank is pumped to and discharged into distribution piping at the top of the sand filter. Gravity does the rest...as the effluent makes its way down through
: : the sand filter, it forces its way into the soil beneath the filter and out into the surrounding area. Beause of the altitude of the sand filter structure, and the inpermeability of the walls, the effluent develops a head pressure of several psi to drive the liquid discharge into the ground.
: : This type of system will work where a traditional drain field is not possible due to hilly terrain or "perk" problems, it can be a fairly expensive means to install however. Bud


: :
: : What is a sand system? Is it better than the leach field one? How often do you have to remove and replace the sand? What about the order?
: : : Need your answer asap
: : : Thanks..

: Bud: Thank-you for letting me know something about this system, what need to also know is does this system need to have the sand changed every couple of years also does it smell in your ard from this system, the area i'm talking about is a high water table. Again asap with an answer. Thanks.

So, 8-10 feet below ground and 6-8 feet above ground?
What are the other dimensions? Can the proportions of
the box be changed?

Can a septic tank be used instead of a "field"? What
makes the difference?


Replies to this post
There are none.