You Tube videos

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by BobL43, Apr 4, 2012.

  1. BobL43

    BobL43 DIY Senior Member

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    We all know that among some good stuff on You tube, there is a load of crap. I was particularly impressed by this series of plumbing how to videos produced by a Brittish Plumbing outfit. Of course some parts used in the UK look a little wierd, and some stuff like the P trap install may not meet US codes, but the efforts put into these videos and the amount of detailed help is amazing, at least to me. I applaud them. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WiuI9EQF7iM&feature=BFa&list=SP666DAF60556A5A33&lf=list_related
  2. BobL43

    BobL43 DIY Senior Member

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    Nobody looked at them> Nuttin to say?:confused::p
  3. Chad Schloss

    Chad Schloss Member

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    USA
    isnt the putty supposed to go under the rim of the flange (in the sink bowl) ?
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2012
  4. BobL43

    BobL43 DIY Senior Member

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    I never use plumbers putty anywhere except to make water dams when I drill holes in porcelain tiles with a diamond hole saw. Every friggin' time I tried using that crap under a sink drain flange, I had problems. I remember once my wife dumped a bunch of ice cubes in the kitchen sink, and it shrunk the putty so when the ran water a few minutes later, there was a leak. I

    found this "soft" slicone that I've been using for years now that easily peels off like that crap they use to hold credit cards to mailings from the bank.

    We use it at work to hold home electronic panels in place, and it has no printing on the lttle tubes. Works great; used some yesterday for my bathroom sink drain. Good thing about it, is if you need to remove the drain, its not a pain (in Spain, on the Plain?). I use it on the bottom of the sink to to make sure that its sealed there too.
    Never had a leak from a drain since I started using that stuff

    But you brought up a good point anyway Chad.
  5. Chad Schloss

    Chad Schloss Member

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    328
    Location:
    USA
    i ask that because I just set my tub drain in yesterday and used some putty under the flange, and the big washer they supply with it under the tub and tightened it pretty good. i don't have a drain yet, so i water tested it overnight with a bottle of water and it held. Maybe I should have used some silicone? yeah i know what you are talking about, with that credit card rubber goop :)
  6. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,285
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    Cave Creek, Arizona
    drain

    qutoe; used some putty under the flange, and the big washer they supply with it under the tub and tightened it pretty good. i don't have a drain yet, so i water tested it overnight with a bottle of The putty keeps the water IN the tub, it does not have anything to do with preventing leaks under the tub. The same with a sink drain. If you do it correctly, you do NOT need "plumber's mate" under the sink, but if you notice, he wiped the excess Plumbersmate off the INSIDE of the sink, not the underside where he put it.
  7. BobL43

    BobL43 DIY Senior Member

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    Location:
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    The pro plumbers don't like regular silicone because it makes removing these pieces a difficult task without possibly damaging something, but this silicone I'm talking about does smell the same (kind of like vinegar) before it cures, but it does not have the full strength of for instance GE Silicone II, and its easy to disassemble things its used on, but it creates a great seal.

    4 years ago, when I did my kitchen over, I bought a nice fresh container of plumber's putty and used it on the strainer basket in the stainless steel sink. It was easy to work with, and tightened up nicely, squeezing out any excess, and was good gor a few weeks until my wife dumped those ice cubes in the sink, and it started leaking. I tried retightening it, but no good.

    Sometimes I wonder what's wrong with me having problems using an item that everybody else has no problem with! I think I'm not alone though, just not everybody talks about it.

    Also, the silicone stuff I use cleans up easy from a sink when it squeezes out from under the flange, unlike the hard to clean mess that GE Silicone II leaves if you don't mask it off first with tape.
  8. u.s.coins

    u.s.coins New Member

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  9. Clog Pro

    Clog Pro New Member

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    Location:
    Vancouver, WA
    I'd like to try to make some videos like this for my company, but I don't know where to start. What kind of equipment do I need to do this? Camera equipment, editing software? I don't know where to start to get something like this going for my company. Thoughts?
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2012
  10. BobL43

    BobL43 DIY Senior Member

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    Location:
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    If you are really serious, all you need is a decent camcorder on a tripod, some lighting and a clear speaking voice. it is easy to post videos on Youtube if you open up an account with them. I posted a few videos on Youtube when I had problems with a Sears Kenmore Elite Fridge for Sears to see the problem happen and see that I was not making up a story. They replaced my fridge for free after that.
    I posted it in a private area requiring a password, because it was only my goal to prove a problem and not to make trouble.

    As far as editing software, I think even Windows moviemaker can do it for you, or Nero, or many other video editing programs out there.

    If you keep each of your videos short, you can try not to make any goof ups at all, or just pause when you need to with the camera. You're not trying to produce a movie like Titatic, afterall.

    The English guy that did the ones I mentioned here, I think did a nice job, and it looked like he may have done it all himself, using a tripod. I don't remember it all right now. I think his job was well thought out compared to other stuff I've seen on You tube, even if his advice may or not be correct in every case. it looked good to me except for that p trap that turned out to be an S trap. I'm no plumber, but as a DIYer, I like instructional videos that are easy to follow and understand.

    I try very hard to do a nice neat and technically correct job in everything I endeavor (yeah, well maybe, lol). So, before I attempt anything new, I do a lot of research and consider advice and conflicting advice as well. So far, life is good.

    Good luck in doing yours.
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2012
  11. BobL43

    BobL43 DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    Ana, here is another example of a well produced video (chuckle)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WVdzP53X9vw
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