What is wrong with this bathroom

Discussion in 'Electrical Forum discussion & Blog' started by burleymike, Nov 7, 2009.

  1. burleymike

    burleymike New Member

    Messages:
    118
    Location:
    Idaho
    Anybody know what the problem is here? It amazes me what happens in brand new construction.

    [​IMG]
  2. Cass

    Cass Plumber

    Messages:
    5,980
    Location:
    Ohio
    Do you mean besides no mirror...
  3. D'Brie

    D'Brie Apprentice Plumber

    Messages:
    44
    Location:
    NW Washington State
    Looks like the lone receptical is not a GFCI. More of them woild also be nice. Not to mention tripping over the Roman tub facuet when you get into the tub.
  4. Cass

    Cass Plumber

    Messages:
    5,980
    Location:
    Ohio
    It may be being fed with a GFCI breaker or being fed from another protected outlet...Many times I have seen a GFCI control on a wall in another part of the bathroom like a separate smaller room with a toilet in it...all these things can not be seen in the pic so there would be no way for us to know...
  5. Cookie

    Cookie .

    Messages:
    5,658
    Location:
    .
    I would think another electrical outlet would be nice on the other end of the sink, I don't care much for the angles in the flooring or the color of the bath. It seems too cramped to me, maybe a badly designed bath arrangement. Other than that it is fine, lol.
  6. D'Brie

    D'Brie Apprentice Plumber

    Messages:
    44
    Location:
    NW Washington State
    Yep, seen this many times also. Good point.
  7. burleymike

    burleymike New Member

    Messages:
    118
    Location:
    Idaho
    Imagine, a curling iron or hair dryer getting knocked off the counter into the bathtub. Not to mention, the overall poor layout.
  8. Cookie

    Cookie .

    Messages:
    5,658
    Location:
    .
    They wouldn't need a water heater.
  9. burleymike

    burleymike New Member

    Messages:
    118
    Location:
    Idaho
    Outlets shall not be installed in bathtub and shower spaces even if installed in a waterproof enclosure. 2002 NEC 406.8

    Perhaps its debatable to some that the outlet is within the tub space. There should be another outlet within 36" of the first basin. Perhaps it is on the sidewall that is cut off in the photo.

    Depending on your definition of "tub space" this may be to code but it is still dangerous and unprofessional.
  10. johnjh2o1

    johnjh2o1 Plumbing Contractor for 49 years

    Messages:
    1,143
    Location:
    South*East
    If you can stand in the tub and reach the outlet it's to close.

    John
  11. Cass

    Cass Plumber

    Messages:
    5,980
    Location:
    Ohio
    Come on now...who doesn't want to curl or dry their hair while taking a bath and listen to raido or watch TV...
  12. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,882
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    gfci

    That is why hair dryers and curlers have GFCI's on their cords AND the outlet is probably connected to a remote GFCI, which I despise because you have to go "find" it when the GFCI trips, unless it is in the same room.
  13. Alectrician

    Alectrician DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    689
    Here, two sinks = two receps.

    I don't know if its NEC or not.

    The existing recep is legal.
  14. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,882
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    recept.

    Here, a single receptacle would either be in the center, or in the corner where most people would store their devices.
  15. Ian Gills

    Ian Gills Senior Robin Hood Guy

    Messages:
    2,777
    Location:
    USA
    I hope that window is made from laminated glass.
  16. Alectrician

    Alectrician DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    689

    Heh heh...one of us is wrong ;)

    We are in the same place.
  17. Jim Port

    Jim Port Electrical Contractor

    Messages:
    156
    Location:
    Maryland
    The NEC required receptacle needs to be within 36" of the bowls. One centered between the bowls would satisfy the NEC. There is not a requirement in the NEC for one per bowl.
  18. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,882
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    glass

    IT is not a shower, and here, a window only has to be tempered/laminated if it is within 18" of the floor.
  19. Ian Gills

    Ian Gills Senior Robin Hood Guy

    Messages:
    2,777
    Location:
    USA
    Tempered Glass Locations starting with the California Code later adopted Nationwide
    1961...Shower enclosures must be tempered safety laminated or wired.
    1964...Glass doors, glass in doors and glass panels within 18 inches of a walking surface had to comply with the impact-rated glass if subjected to accidental human impact. Tempered-glass must be etched.
    1976...Complete rewrite: Glass in doors, glazing immediately adjacent to doors, glass adjacent to any walking surface, sliding glass doors and fixed glass panels, shower doors and enclosures had to be tempered, safety laminated or wired.
    1979...Wire glass no longer approved for shower and bathtub enclosures.
    1982... Expanded section to include all cases where safety glazing is required: glass doors, sliding and fixed panels, storm doors, unframed swinging glass doors, shower and bath tub enclosures, glazing within 12 inches of a swinging door, fixed glass panels less than 18 inches above the finish floor and within 36 inches of a walking surface. An exemption for protective was included.
    1988...No change except that glass in rails was included.
    1991... Glass windows in shower or bathtub enclosures were included. Glass panels within 24 inches of the vertical side of a door were also added. Exceptions were reformatted.
    1994... No changes except those glass panels forming swimming pool enclosures have to be safety laminated or tempered within 5 feet of a pool deck. Also, glazing enclosing a stairway landing or within 5 feet of the top or bottom of a stairway must be safety laminated or tempered.
    2000 IRC
    308.4 #7 Glazing in an individual fixed or operable panel, other than those locations described in Items 5 and 6 above, that meets all of the following conditions:
    7.1 Exposed area of an individual pane greater than 9 sf.
    7.2 Bottom edge less than 18 inches above the floor.
    7.3 Top edge greater than 36 inches above the floor.
    7.4 One or more walking surfaces within 36 inches of the glazing.
    2003 IRC
    R308.4 Hazardous locations. The following shall be considered specific hazardous locations for the purposes of tempered glazing:
    - 1. Glazing in swinging doors except jalousies.
    - 2. Glazing in fixed and sliding panels of sliding door assemblies and panels in sliding and bifold closet door assemblies.
    - 3. Glazing in storm doors.
    - 4. Glazing in all unframed swinging doors.
    - 5. Glazing in doors and enclosures for hot tubs, whirlpools, saunas, steam rooms, bathtubs and showers. Glazing in any part of a building wall enclosing these compartments where the bottom exposed edge of the glazing is less than 60 inches (1524 mm) measured vertically above any standing or walking surface.
    - 6. Glazing, in an individual fixed or operable panel adjacent to a door where the nearest vertical edge is within a 24-inch (610 mm) arc of the door in a closed position and whose bottom edge is less than 60 inches (1524 mm) above the floor or walking surface.
    - 7. Glazing in an individual fixed or operable panel, other than those locations described in Items 5 and 6 above, that meets all of the following conditions:
    - - 7.1. Exposed area of an individual pane greater than 9 square feet (0.836 m2).
    - - 7.2. Bottom edge less than 18 inches (457 mm) above the floor.
    - - 7.3. Top edge greater than 36 inches (914 mm) above the floor.
    - - 7.4. One or more walking surfaces within 36 inches (914 mm) horizontally of the glazing.
    - 8. All glazing in railings regardless of an area or height above a walking surface. Included are structural baluster panels and nonstructural in-fill panels, intervening wall or other permanent barrier between the door and the glazing.
    - 9. Glazing in walls and fences enclosing indoor and outdoor swimming pools, hot tubs and spas where the bottom edge of the glazing is less than 60 inches (1524 mm) above a walking surface and within 60 inches (1524 mm) horizontally of the water's edge. This shall apply to single glazing and all panes in multiple glazing.
    - 10. Glazing adjacent to stairways, landings and ramps within 36 inches (914 mm) horizontally of a walking surface when the exposed surface of the glass is less than 60 inches (1524 mm) above the plane of the adjacent walking surface.
    - 11. Glazing adjacent to stairways within 60 inches (1524 mm) horizontally of the bottom tread of a stairway in any direction when the exposed surface of the glass is less than 60 inches (1524 mm) above the nose of the tread.
    - Exception: The following products, materials and uses are exempt from the above hazardous locations:
    - - 1. Openings in doors through which a 3-inch (76 mm) sphere is unable to pass.
    - - 2. Decorative glass in Items 1, 6 or 7.
    - - 3. Glazing in Section R308.4, Item 6, when there is an intervening wall or other permanent barrier between the door and the glazing.
    - - 4. Glazing in Section R308.4, Item 6, in walls perpendicular to the plane of the door in a closed position or where access through the door is to a closet or storage area 3 feet (914 mm) or less in depth. Glazing in these applications shall comply with Section R308.4, Item 7.
    - - 5. Glazing in Section R308.4, Items 7 and 10, when a protective bar is installed on the accessible side(s) of the glazing 36 inches +/- 2 inches (914 mm +/- 51 mm) above the floor. The bar shall be capable of withstanding a horizontal load of 50 pounds per linear foot (74.5 kg/m) without contacting the glass and be a minimum of 1½ inches (38 mm) in height.
    - - 6. Outboard panes in insulating glass units and other multiple glazed panels in Section R308.4, Item 7, when the bottom edge of the glass is 25 feet (7620 mm) or more above grade, a roof, walking surface, or other horizontal [within 45 degrees (0.79 rad) of horizontal] surface adjacent to the glass exterior.
    - - 7. Louvered windows and jalousies complying with the requirements of Section R308.2.
    - - 8. Mirrors and other glass panels mounted or hung on a surface that provides a continuous backing support.
    - - 9. Safety glazing in Section R308.4, Items 10 and 11 is not required where:
    - - 9.1. The side of a stairway, landing or ramp has a guardrail or handrail, including balusters or in-fill panels, complying with the provisions of Sections 1003.3.12 and 1607.7 of the International Building Code; and
    - - 9.2. The plane of the glass is greater than 18 inches (457 mm) from the railing.
  20. Cass

    Cass Plumber

    Messages:
    5,980
    Location:
    Ohio
    So...Ian...does your home meet all the requirements...
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