What are the trade-offs in setting pump pressure?

Discussion in 'Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog' started by guy48065, Nov 19, 2013.

  1. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa DIYer, not in the trades

    Messages:
    4,062
    Location:
    NW Ontario, Canada
    If you have enough pump and good plumbing without encumbrances, there is no reason not to enjoy good pressure.
  2. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,495
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    Yeah I say this all the time. It is your water system. There is no reason you can’t have way more pressure than any city water supply. You just have to want it, and learn how to make it happen.
  3. DonL

    DonL Jack of all trades Master of one

    Messages:
    4,328
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    The more pressure your system has, the more maintenance you have on your water heater, fill valves, water lines, etc...

    You also have a better chance of getting a water leak that will flood your house quicker.

    The minimum pressure needed to maintain a good living should be used.


    People are getting spoiled now a days.
  4. guy48065

    guy48065 Member

    Messages:
    117
    Location:
    SE and north MI
    Teach me, ObiWan--that's why I started the thread.
    I'm seriously considering incorporating a CSV in both my systems. Constant pressure seems like the correct approach--it's definitely the approach in the hydraulic world I'm familiar with. I need to re-ask my question from post #11:
    70?...
  5. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,495
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    The pressure switch needs to be set to shut off the pump at least 20 PSI lower than the max pressure your pump can build, considering the maximum pumping level. Then the CSV needs to be set 5 to 10 PSI lower than the off setting of the pressure switch. I run 50/70 on my pressure switch with a 60 PSI setting for the CSV as I have one bath upstairs. Love the pressure. Almost don't need soap in the shower, and never had any problems with the house plumbing.
  6. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa DIYer, not in the trades

    Messages:
    4,062
    Location:
    NW Ontario, Canada
    I dare not test what the max pressure is that my pump can build since it exceeds the max pressure rating of my tank, iron filter, softener, and house plumbing. I have tested it to 80 PSI.

    Also, pumps run on a curve, so at max pressure the GPM is less than what is needed, so I'd get max pressure to fill a glass with water but less pressure at much higher volumes. The micronizer, iron filter, and softener also conspire to limit GPM which in turn limit pressure.
  7. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,495
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    Do not test the max pressure the pump can build by holding down the pressure switch. Yes the pressure could be well over 100 PSI. I use the max pressure on the pump curve, and subtract the pumping level or the pump setting level if pumping level is not known.

    Yes flow decreases as pressure increases, so at zero flow rate the pump builds the most pressure. When you are using water you can decrease the pressure by opening up more flow. But when there is no flow being used, the max pressure possible is determined by the pump curve and the water level.

    You just don’t want to turn up the pressure switch so high the pump can’t build enough pressure to reach the shut off point.
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