WH on apt. bldg upper floor

Discussion in 'Water Heater Forum, Tanks' started by philbob57, Jul 28, 2009.

  1. philbob57

    philbob57 New Member

    Messages:
    5
    My city's code states: "A pan or receptor with a drain or a floor drain in an impervious floor shall be required for all water heaters, and clothes washing machines in multifamily and commercial occupancies."

    I live on the 4th floor of an apt bldg. There's no floor drain in my apt. I just installed a WH in a closet in a bedroom. I had it placed in a drip pan which doesn't drain anywhere. The plumber suggested not using the pan. There's a great h/w store near me; the staff is very knowledgeable and very helpful - they looked at me as if I was crazy when I asked how to comply with the code.

    I understand the dangers. There's a similar WH right above mine w/no drain and no drip pan, and i understand the danger of that.

    But has anyone on this forum complied with a code like this? How did you do it? Among other things, what did you use to elevate the WH, which certainly seems necessary in my apartment?

    Thanks in advance.

    PB
  2. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,615
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    heater

    You elevate the heater with bricks or concrete blocks, but unless there is a way to extend a drain to the exterior of the building there is no way to drain the water from the pan safely. But it will help give an indication of leakage if the drain opening is in a visible location.
  3. philbob57

    philbob57 New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Thanks for your response.

    Let me rephrase my question -

    Has anyone on this forum installed a WH on an upper floor of an apartment building (not a detached or semi-detached house) in a way that meets the requirement?

    If so, what did you do to comply?

    Thanks.

    PB
  4. MACPLUMB 777

    MACPLUMB 777 TROJAN WORLDWIDE SALES RP

    Messages:
    679
    Location:
    Houston, Texas, United States
    Water heater discharge line

    YES MANY MANY TIMES !

    NO THERE IS NO PHYSICAL OR PROPER WAY TO CONFORM TO THIS CODE REQUIREMENT

    THE BEST THING TO DO IS GET ON THIS SITE AND USE THE ALARM AND SHUT OFF VALVE


    http://www.rewci.com/floodstopwaterheater.html
  5. philbob57

    philbob57 New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Thanks very much.

    A sensor that shuts off the water if a leak is detected sounds like the best approach.

    PB
  6. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,995
    Location:
    New England
    Another choice is a www.wagsvalve.com . If you have a leak with this type, you must replace the valve, so no testing...
  7. MACPLUMB 777

    MACPLUMB 777 TROJAN WORLDWIDE SALES RP

    Messages:
    679
    Location:
    Houston, Texas, United States
    Water heater placement ! ! !

    Yes but that only works if you have a gas fired water heater ! !

    You don't put a gas water heater in bedroom closet ! it's against gas code !

    Therefore a electric water heater which a WAG'S will not work on
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2009
  8. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,615
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Wags

    The WAGS WILL turn off the water to an electric heater which will stop the flood. If the heater is drained of water by the leak, which is not likely, and the elements turn on, they will almost immediately burn out, stopping any power flow.

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