Wet venting a toilet HELP

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by HDBJ, Mar 20, 2009.

  1. HDBJ

    HDBJ New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Maryland
    Hi,

    I am adding a second floor ½ bath where I need to plumb a toilet and a sink into a 3†ABS vertical drain that leads down to the basement. The location of the 3†vertical is such that I would like to place the WC directly above it. Can I put a sanitee 3x2x3 on top of the 3†vertical drain with the 2†outlet in the horizontal direction to serve as both the drain for a sink upstream and as a wet vent for the WC? The WC flange would basically be on top of the sanitee connected by a couple inch section of 3†pipe. The 2†wet vent will travel only 1 foot horizontally with a ¼†pitch when it will enter the wall and turn vertically with two 45 degree fittings. The 2†wet vent will continue vertically for about 2’ where I will attach a 2x1-1/2x2 sanitee. The 1-1/2†horizontal opening will serve as the drain for the sink about 2-1/2’ away where I will add a P trap under the sink. The 2†vertical opening on the sanitee will server as the dry vent for both the WC and sink and travel up through the ceiling and out the roof.

    In the basement is where I will tie into the existing 3†horizontal (1/4†pitch) waste drain, downstream of all other fixtures from first floor, using a 3†wye fitting on its side.

    Does this sound code acceptable with new 2006 UPC 908.4 wet vent codes?

    The only other thing I could possibly think of doing is use a 90 El Heel and use the heel coming off vertically to server as the wet vent. And use a 90 deg long up to the WC with the dirty arm drain as short as possible; say 6â€.

    Thanks in advance,
    Howard
  2. nhmaster

    nhmaster Master Plumber

    Messages:
    3,189
    Location:
    S. Maine
    No you can not do almost anything you have said. Is that 3" pipe a vent for the downstairs? If so, you can not use it for waste at all.
  3. HDBJ

    HDBJ New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Maryland
    No, maybe I didn't describe it correctly. The 3" vertical line is not a vent. It is a new line I put in to serve as the waste drain of the new second floor 1/2 bath down to the basement. It is not connected to anything yet but will be connected to another waste line in the basement. Are the other options I described to wet vent a toilet not allowed? I'm trying to get the toilet installed as close to the top of the new 3" vertical drain line as possible. Do you have any suggestions? I saw in the B&D Plumbing book pictures of a traditional dry vent of toilet using a 90 el heel 1/4 bend. Is wet venting using wash from sink above not allowed?
  4. nhmaster

    nhmaster Master Plumber

    Messages:
    3,189
    Location:
    S. Maine

    It's not the toilet that needs the vent, it's the other fixtures. Toilets are self siphoning fixtures that get all the vent they need from the open bowel. The IPC lists toilet to vent distance as Unlimited. In any case a sanitary tee, reducing or otherwise, can not be used in the horizontal position to recieve the waste of any fixture. They can only be place in the horizontal position either 6" above the flood level rim of the highest fixture served, or when the vertical branch of the horizontal sanitary tee is dry and does not recieve the waste of any fixture above. One possible and usefull fitting here might be what is called a cottage tee, where the 3" would receive the toilet waste and the 2" side inlet would take the shower and lav. The 3" vertical can be the vent.
  5. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,651
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    tee

    One revision to the use of the cottage tee. It would serve as the drain for a tub or shower, but NOT for a lavatory, unless the lavatory had its own proper vent. There is no way a cottage tee, by itself, could be used for a lavatory unless it had an "S" trap drain.
  6. SewerRatz

    SewerRatz Illinois Licensed Plumber

    Messages:
    1,705
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    I have not seen an inspector here that allowed cottage fittings anymore in years. Also stringer fittings have been disallowed by most inspectors, when the come across an excising stringer fitting during a remodel the tell the contractor and home owner it must be removed.
  7. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,011
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    Some places allow a lav over a toilet

    If not, you can cut in a wye below the santee for the toilet and vent it normally.

    Attached Files:

  8. nhmaster

    nhmaster Master Plumber

    Messages:
    3,189
    Location:
    S. Maine
    I use the lav to wet vent the shower. both fixtures drain into the 2" inlet of the cottage tee. You can also use a side inlet elbow to achieve the same results. Wish I had a way to draw nice little diagrams but I'm a hack with drawing programs.
  9. SewerRatz

    SewerRatz Illinois Licensed Plumber

    Messages:
    1,705
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    It almost looks like Terry had drawn that on paper and took a picture of it.
  10. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,011
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    Yeah,
    That's what I did. It takes way too long to use a prgram for me.
    I can plumb the darn thing quicker than I can draw it.
  11. nhmaster

    nhmaster Master Plumber

    Messages:
    3,189
    Location:
    S. Maine
    Same thing. I am an absolute hack with any drawing program. I got one of those Bamboo pen tablets that lets you draw freehand. Looks like someone put the pen in the hands of a palsy victim.
  12. HDBJ

    HDBJ New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Maryland
    I'm back with another option

    Thanks everyone for the advice.

    I just got back into this project and decided to abandon my first design as it will never meet code. I decided to put the work in and move my stack vent over to another location and now have two options based on Terry's drawing (the drawing on the left with no revent). I have made a drawing and really want to use option 1 since it does not require an access door to get to the clean out. But I do not know if this will pass code. Does the C.O. of a vertical stack need to be on the vertical section or can it be before a total of 135 degrees of turn are made? Any other things in these drawings that may not be up to code?

    Thanks,
    Howard

    Attached Files:

  13. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,651
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Actually, I cannot visualize any inspector requiring ONE cleanout in that piping since it is all above ground, much less two of them. The only real purpose for the second cleanout would be to plug the pipe to perform a water test on the system. IF they did require a cleanout, I would use option #2 and then cover it with sheetrock to bury it forever. Or, use a cleanout cover plate with a screw in the middle, which is what we always do.
Similar Threads: venting toilet
Forum Title Date
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Another toilet venting question Jul 14, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Will this toilet venting work? Jul 12, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Properly venting a toilet underslab, help please! Jun 25, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Sink and Toilet Venting and Tie Ins Jan 10, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Bill gates reinventing the toilet?!? Aug 14, 2012

Share This Page