Water Heater.. BEFORE and AFTER

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by tl2tl, Nov 26, 2008.

  1. tl2tl

    tl2tl New Member

    Messages:
    30
    Ok, I finally received one heater and installed it, still waiting for the second one.

    I tried the BrassCraft black braided flex connectors but found their threads very flimsy as they strip with minimal force.

    I ended up using corrugated copper connectors, a hex nipple, a threaded valve and a compression fitting.

    Still need to connect the discharge tube and insulate the pipes.

    My only regret is not having replaced the gas pipe valve and union.

    No leaks in either water or gas pipes and the flue pulls well.

    Should I keep an eye for the leaks from the numerous connections I made or will they hold since there were no leaks to begin with?

    Any comments/feedback on the install?

    Thanks to everyone for their input.

    Here's before and after shots.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  2. jar546

    jar546 In the Trades

    Messages:
    432
    Location:
    USA
    Don't forget your TPR discharge tube.
  3. 99k

    99k Radon Contractor and Water Treatment

    Messages:
    460
    Location:
    Fairfield Co.,Connecticut

    Good catch Jar!
  4. kingsotall

    kingsotall Plunger/TurdPuncher

    They already mentioned that.
  5. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,329
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    That looks like a pretty good job! Did you use a flexible gas pipe? I find them to be very helpful along with the flexible copper pipes for water heaters.
  6. tl2tl

    tl2tl New Member

    Messages:
    30
    Yes, I still need to connect the TP discharge pipe as I mentioned in my OP. And I will wait couple of weeks before insulating the cold and hot pipes just in case there are any leaks.

    Thanks Gary. :)
    I was hoping to use fewer connections but that was hard to do without sweating the pipes.
    And I did buy the flex gas pipe just in case, but was able to re-use the black pipe connections by just replacing 2 of the nipples with different lengths.
    I may have to use that flex pipe on the second heater since it probably will not line up as nicely.

    [​IMG]
  7. nhmaster

    nhmaster Master Plumber

    Messages:
    3,189
    Location:
    S. Maine
    Is that a galvanized tee? Cause they don't allow them in my neck o the woods.
  8. jar546

    jar546 In the Trades

    Messages:
    432
    Location:
    USA

    Good catch on the galvanized tee which it looks like it is.
  9. tl2tl

    tl2tl New Member

    Messages:
    30
    No, that's actually a brand new shiny iron "T". :D

    But the old heater next to this new one, which was installed by a "pro" has a galvanized T, galvanized sediment trap, galvanized joint union and a galvanized elbow in the gas connections. (See the pic below)

    I don't know what the code here calls for, but I've learned from you guys not to mix g.s. with black pipe in gas lines. I'm still not sure the exact reason for it though.

    I definitely will be replacing those galvanized steel pieces when I install the new tank, which should've been here already last week. :mad:

    [​IMG]
  10. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    Why don't they allow galv. tee? I thought that was ancient history. No problem with any galv. fittings hereabouts.
  11. Ian Gills

    Ian Gills Senior Robin Hood Guy

    Messages:
    2,780
    Location:
    USA
    I do not understand why you used teflon and what looks like pipe dope on all of those compression fittings.

    Yes, these work great on the nipples, but for compression fittings they are a no-no.

    I also trust that you (like me) have an open system with no check valve in the meter or a pressure reducing valve on the main line, otherwise you would need an expansion tank.

    And was it yellow teflon tape for the gas work, if you used it?

    Earthquake straps if needed? i.e. California.

    And please do not use an insulation blanket, like on your old heater, for this newer model. They are a fire risk.
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2008
  12. There should be 1 screw for every inch of flue size, per joint.

    3" flue pipe, 3 screws per connection.

    This prevents the ability of that pipe to come apart easily. I see one screw that helps, but one screw applications are found on dryer vents, not flue pipe carrying dangerous fumes to the flue chase.

    Those copper flexes will leak where they join, that's a guarantee and I'll send you a set if I'm wrong.


    Had my hands on too many leakers to know that they just don't "not" leak.
  13. tl2tl

    tl2tl New Member

    Messages:
    30
    You're very observant :)

    And you're right, I did use BOTH tape and pipe dope on all the connections I made. For gas connections I used the yellow gas tape.

    I have 2 compression fittings there. I was aware that pipe dope was not required for them.
    However, someone very knowledgeable (I forget who and what site, but it was someone whose name I recognized at the time) mentioned that he used light coating of pipe dope on his compression fittings so I decided to use it as well.
    It's the type that doesn't harden so I used some around the tape also. I figured it won't hurt, and so far so good.

    According to the pro I was going to hire to do the job, it's an open system. In his words, "if you didn't need one (expansion tank) in the last 15 years, you won't need one now".
    He was not going to put one in as part of his install, but the sticker shock of his quote made me look into doing the job myself.

    No blankets on new heaters and no need for strapping in my part of the woods.

    Thanks for your comments and suggestions.
  14. tl2tl

    tl2tl New Member

    Messages:
    30
    Thanks for the screws suggestion.
    Once I complete the final adjustments on the vent piping and after the second water heater is installed, I will add more screws and also will use foil tape around the connections.

    The leaks from the joints are a concern (hence the overkill with both tape and pipe dope) and I will be keeping an eye on them.
    BTW, do they tend to leak from the threaded connections or from the plastic jacket?

    But I will be happy even if they last couple of years, since they're easy to replace.
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2008
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