Washer Standpipe Drain

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by SS, May 27, 2011.

  1. SS

    SS New Member

    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    30301
    Last edited by a moderator: May 28, 2011
  2. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,347
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    What are we supposed to see? Is there a trap? Is the pipe 2" or larger? Is there a vent? Back off a bit so we can see more of the drain.
    Last edited: May 27, 2011
  3. SS

    SS New Member

    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    30301
  4. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,347
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    If I am seeing this right, there isn't much right about this. First, it would appear that the standpipe comes down into a P trap which is OK, but then the pipe goes into the wall and elbows down. Since there is no vent between the trap and the elbow, this creates an illegal S trap. Next problem. New washers empty their water much faster than older ones. This has lead to a requirement that washer drains be 2" minimum. Usually this means a 2" standpipe, trap and then somewhere after that into a 3" or 4" main drain.
  5. SS

    SS New Member

    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    30301
    Thanks for the input. Was trying to pump for information without influencing with details.

    Yes, this is a gawd awful setup and drain. All plumbers who see it heave. It is subject to clogs each year and overflow which I'm hoping to improve. I have also just learned about the new washers and their outflow.

    I'm getting estimates on having it reworked better. It was pointed out yesterday that the 1-1/2" standpipe might actually be running into a 2" drain so the pipe could be increased.

    I now see what they are saying and am wondering about that wider piece at the base that the pipe is fitting into. What is it and why, can it be removed so the pipe can be enlarged to 2", etc.

    On the s-trap, what type of curve should be reconfigured?
  6. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,614
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    We do not see what the P trap is connecting to so it is strictly an assumption that it is an elbow, creating an S trap, rather than a tee which would be proper. I have to take your word for it being 1 1/2" because it LOOKS LIKE 2", but we have nothing to compare the size to. There seems to be a "dogleg" at the floor for some reason, but we also have NOTHING which would cause us to assume you have a 2" line which would be easily accessible.
  7. SS

    SS New Member

    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    30301
    Yes, I'm wondering how the pipe is connected to the drain at the floor. A plumber who was here said it looked like it might be running into a 2" drain, rather than a 1-1/2" drain -- I assume because it is slipping inside of something larger for some reason (looks like iron pipe to me). He said it's hard to see what's going on or why. He didn't seem to think it was normal.

    I am hoping it's not a 1-1/2" drain below and that someone would recognize the connector piece and whether it could be fitting into a drain larger than 1-1/2". What it's purpose would be if not. I guess you're saying it's an elbow of some sort that could have 1-1/2" fittings at both ends?

    The whole washer drain situation needs to be remedied. 1-1/2" is not to code or sufficient; moreso with the new washers coming along.

    It will be changed to a T-trap.

    The standpipe is definitely 1-1/2" and undersized, as every plumber has stated.

    1973 townhouse, previously apartments.

    Thanks.
  8. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    14,999
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    I can't believe nobody had replaced that yet.

    Someone busted a hole in the fitting, and used a kitchen sink deck cover on the hole.

    What is it about Atlanta?
    We have more stories about hack plumbing from Atlanta then other other city in the US.

    [​IMG]
  9. SS

    SS New Member

    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    30301
    Hi Terry,

    I can't believe it either. Many a plumber has been through here over the years (often for drain cleaning) and I've asked about the setup and its problems. They all are sick when they see it. This is the first time it's come up about the odd connection to the drain and what size the pipe might be underneath to change it to a 2" standpipe.

    Yes, the guy who initially worked on the kitchen was an unbelievable hack. He was hired by a developer to convert these apartments into townhomes.


    Someone busted a hole in the fitting, and used a kitchen sink deck cover on the hole

    Can you explain this more? Busted a hole in what fitting? Any idea about the drain size from what can be seen or was done?

    I don't think busting up the kitchen floor is going to happen, if a change can't be made in the near vicinity of what is seen here (a dishwasher over concrete is on the other side of the wall and can be hammered there but beyond the d/w is tile).

    One plumber said he would chip some of the concrete away to try to see what was going on.

    Thanks for identifying the part!

    SS
    Last edited: May 28, 2011
  10. SS

    SS New Member

    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    30301
    Are you saying that rusty iron piece that the pipe fits into is a kitchen sink deck cover? What would be its purpose? Does the other end below the surface also fit over a 1-1/2" pipe?
  11. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    14,999
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    kitchen_sink_hole_cover.jpg

    They used one of these for a plug. Or at least something like this.
    If anyone replumbs the upper part, you might have them install a proper cleanout on the verical section after the p-trap. That way the plumber can run a snake through the line better.
  12. cwhyu2

    cwhyu2 Consultant

    Messages:
    1,347
    Location:
    Cincinnati OH
    Looks to me that 1.5" copper is cemented into 2" cast iron.You would need to remove the copper,once that is done then have C.I. rodded out then rebuild using the proper connectors.Can you find a vent as it will be needed.
  13. SS

    SS New Member

    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    30301
    I see what you're talking about, Terry. Yes the blasted boiler plug that collects debris, pin rusts apart, and I can't get it back on tightly if I try to clean it out myself. With the first snaking, a hole was cut in the pipe for that.
  14. SS

    SS New Member

    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    30301
    CY, thanks. The plumber did say something about it looking cemented in; maybe a 2". Now I can see what you're all talking about. I chipped a little away to see the pipe rim size better. So, the pipe looks placed up against the pipe on the right side and the void on the left near the dime is filled. It does look more like 1/4" of fill, to me. Is there a 1-3/4" drain size? Hopefully it's filled around the standpipe perimeter more than I can see. Yellow lines show the rim edge of the iron drain pipe

    Is cementing a pipe in an accepted practice? Sounds like it could be another reason why this drain has clogging problems, if some got down inside.

    https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/FgYebir7trLaJn1DgA776zo1MkYIb0sgypJ-nvmyRMk?feat=directlink

    https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/_KbjBMlcMho_iXbn0IZiLWZBWlGX1ger1ZaLeOlrO60?feat=directlink
    Last edited: May 28, 2011
  15. SS

    SS New Member

    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    30301
    I think when you say vent, you mean a trap? One of the plumbers who came through described what he would do which would bring it to code. I think this was in hopes that it was a 2" pipe.

    Right now the washer and water heater release valve fit into the top of the standpipe. The dishwasher drain also runs into the side of the pipe directly somewhat mid-way down.

    I hate to misrepresent his idea, but it was something like below (can't remember the shape of the trap he drew). He would put separate traps for each of the lines dropping into the pipe -- washer, dishwasher, water heater release valve.

    https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/omTVjqOuzVsD9GwAflqmeC_IE4X1uz6lLXipsw2h-kc?feat=directlink
  16. SS

    SS New Member

    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    30301
    By George, I measured with a piece of paper and the iron pipe interior does, in fact, measure at 2 inches. Whew. I can't believe after all these years, decades, that this is the first time anyone has pulled the darn material away to actually look at the drain pipe itself. So it looks like this will be able to be brought to code at 2 inches and be able to handle the two fixtures that drain into it.
  17. SS

    SS New Member

    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    30301
    With a drain that's temperamental to clogging, I guess it's prudent to just snake the thing each year whether it needs it or not? This is on my living level and the washer drain water overflows the pipe when it's not clear, damaging the flooring nearby. And one might not always be right there to know it is happening. I'm not aware of warning signs before this condition occurs.

    I also wonder if food gunk from the dishwasher is a problem for the drain. Are sink drains larger and better equipped for grease and food debris?
  18. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,347
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    The dishwasher is not properly drained either. The T/P can drain into the washer stand pipe. You really need to open the wall up so you can see what is going on. It is possible what I first thought was an elbow that created an S trap is actually a tee which connects a vent. If that is the case, this may not be as bad as it looks. Remove everything to the main drain and replace with properly sized pipe, P trap, and vent and you should be good to go. But, that DW drain has to be redone.
  19. SS

    SS New Member

    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    30301
    I guess I don't know where the vent fits in or is. I believe he said something about venting but don't recall what.

    How do you mean redo the d/w drain? Not straight into the pipe? Needs a trap? Shouldn't use this pipe?

    I'm not sure why he sketched a 3rd trap for the t/p rather than just in at the top of the standpipe as it is now. Maybe he was thinking to close off the top?

    It's all exposed. Here is a shot of the whole kaboodle. There is no T. It will be done with a T during the redo.

    Thanks.


    https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/9GxDaRpJvE1v1VuotWRLlcauINhMzNbkX05Z4yfTOl4?feat=directlink

    https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/UclGPAUu4F-YraP4T91_ky_Yjdi2Gjc9fYS95fWZarE?feat=directlink
  20. SS

    SS New Member

    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    30301
    He said he'd replace with cement backer board on the bottom of the closet instead of drywall because it takes a good beating from water if there's an overflow again. I thought that was a great idea. Thinking ahead, now I'm wondering, though, if that will impede easy access to the pipes behind the wall. Also, if there happens to be a leak behind the wall it won't be obvious, as it is with drywall. What do you think? Backerboard ok instead of drywall? Foresee any problems with that? I guess it would mean access from the other side of the walls, room-side, if the pipes needed work for some reason. That closet is tight anyway. Obviously he must have noted where the water lines run, etc.
Similar Threads: Washer Standpipe
Forum Title Date
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Adding laundry sink and washer to existing standpipe May 10, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Sink and dishwasher drain to abandoned washer standpipe Feb 6, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Unusual washer standpipe. pls help Apr 24, 2013
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Trap placement question for washer standpipe Nov 24, 2011
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Horizontal Washer Drain AFTER Standpipe 3 iinch?????? Oct 28, 2011

Share This Page