Washer Dryer Hook Up Moving to Upstairs

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by skoby, Jun 3, 2012.

  1. skoby

    skoby New Member

    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    First I want to thank everyone here for giving their time to help others. My plumbing skills are limited but I have put in a water heater, a few sinks, toilets, and garbage disposal.

    This seems fairly simple but I want to make sure I'm ok with this set up. I want to move my washer/dryer hookup to upstairs. I'm probably within 1 or 2 wall studs from the existing downstairs drain.

    Here are the questions

    1) I was going to "T" off of the existing sink plumbing, is that ok?

    2) With the new P Trap, should go through the wall stud(s) upstairs and then straight down using 1/4 bend fittings to where the original drain was and hook into that?

    3) Can I run the new pipe directly into the old P trap? The reason I ask is that it seems it may be easier to access but if I can't then I won't.

    4) Is there anything else at this point I should be thinking about?

    I haven't opened the wall downstairs yet but so far am I on the right track? Thanks for any help.

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  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,270
    Location:
    New England
    You can tap off the existing supply for the WM, but your drain will not work. The trap must be on the same floor, and there are requirements about the height as well as the stand pipe going into it. Then, it must be vented. You can never run a trapped fixture into a second trap and have things work well. The drain line must be at least 2".
  3. skoby

    skoby New Member

    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    I didn't think the trap into another trap would be a good idea.

    Thanks
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2012
  4. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    I am assuming you do not intend to actually pipe the drain into the existing trap. But your big problem is the vent. That new trap on the second floor must be vented. If you open the walls, there will be a vent off the sink, and you could probably tie into that.

    Check with your codes to see if a washer/dryer is allowed in the bathroom, especially if that bathroom is linked to a bedroom.
  5. skoby

    skoby New Member

    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    The W/D would be outside of the bathroom on the landing at the top of the stairs.

    I am able to use an AAV so I think that would solve the venting issue.

    I'm about 90% certain the existing drain runs through a concrete wall. I'd prefer not to break through the concrete.

    The first pic is the upstairs landing where I'd like to put the new hookup. I showed where I could run the pipe outside of the inner wall and through the floor to the existing drain (minus the old P Trap).

    The second pic is the downstairs existing P trap. I would eliminate the P trap and wye into it.

    Does this look ok?

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  6. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,303
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    Removing the p-trap downstairs and using a 90 to bring it upstairs works.
    The AAV upstairs could vent the new relocated washer p-trap.
  7. jadziedzic

    jadziedzic Member

    Messages:
    96
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    Washing machines can overflow and supply hoses can leak, so you should consider how you might incorporate a drain pan or floor drain into your plans to accommodate that possibility. Check with your local authority having jurisdiction (I'm assuming you're going to pull a permit) to see if those are required.

    (Putting a washer and dryer on a second-floor landing seems, well, sort of "odd" - not that you asked.)
  8. skoby

    skoby New Member

    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Thanks for the heads up.
  9. skoby

    skoby New Member

    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    I'm looking into another option. The initial drain I was going into was only 1 1/2 inch.

    I pulled the bathroom wall down a bit to see what I was working with. The sinks appear to be wet vented and I believe I cannot run my waste water there (per Massachusetts code).

    I am thinking of running my waste to the drain where my bath tub is.

    I was going to replace the bathtub this summer so cutting into it isn't an issue.

    My drain would have to come outside the wall to get around the wet vent. It may not be aesthetically appealing but at this time seems to be the only option (if it's even is an option).

    The total run of the drain would be appr 8 ft.


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  10. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,303
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    A washer can't wet vent over a tub. It siphons the trap.

    You will want to drop the drain through the floor, and tie in below the toilet. Then you can vent as you normally do.
  11. skoby

    skoby New Member

    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    When you say tie in below the toilet, do you mean tie in under where the toilet drain connects to the stack? If so, I may have to bust through the concrete which I was trying to avoid but if I have to then I will.
  12. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,303
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    Is that bathroom on a concrete slab? I'm trying to wrap my mind around what you have there.
  13. skoby

    skoby New Member

    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    The bathroom is on the second floor above the kitchen on floor joists.

    The downstairs is slab with concrete block walls which end just below the second floor. I have access to the drain pipes on the second floor but they go behind the concrete on the lower floor.

    Here's a picture of the kitchen just below the bathroom.

    Do I need to tie into the tub drain or can I tie in under the toilet like you mentioned? I may have to pull up the bathroom floor and sub floor and go through the joists but I'd rather do that then go through the concrete wall on the first level wall. What do you think?



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    Last edited: Jun 5, 2012
  14. skoby

    skoby New Member

    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    I still have the option of an AAV according to a local plumber.
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2012
  15. skoby

    skoby New Member

    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    The 3" pipe is a wet vent so I can't tie in there. To the left of the vent (a few feet) there appears to be another stack as I can see it on the roof and remember seeing it downstairs through a broken cinderblock. This is also appr where the tub is sitting.

    Would this stack be a strictly soil stack meaning there shouldn't be other pipes using it as a vent.

    I ask because if this is true then I could use this stack. It's hard to tell if anything is using it as a vent because the pipes are behind cinder blocks.

    If soil stacks are not used for venting then this would answer my question as to whether or not I could tie in there.
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2012
  16. skoby

    skoby New Member

    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    What are the requirements for a laundry sink. There's a 1 1/2" drain pipe on floor below where I'd like to put the washer.

    If 1 1/2" is ok then I could run a pipe one floor down and into a laundry sink. It's not the best solution but may be allowable if the 1 1/2" drain is sufficient.

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    Last edited: Jun 6, 2012
  17. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,303
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    A laundry sink is supposed to be 2" waste line and 1.5" trap arm.
    A washer is 2" waste line and 2" trap arm.
    Some areas like a 3" waste line and 2" trap arm for a washer.
  18. Tom Sawyer

    Tom Sawyer In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,268
    Location:
    Maine
    IPC is now all 3" waste and 2" trap arm.

    If you are in Mass, doing this without a permit and a license could land you in a world of trouble and wind up costing ten times what you saved by doing it yourself. Not that I'm being anti DIY here because I have been accused of that before, just telling you the what if's. Massachusetts is not a DIY plumbing friendly environment.
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2012
  19. skoby

    skoby New Member

    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Looks like I'm at a standstill for now.
  20. skoby

    skoby New Member

    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Massachusetts

    I haven't done anything yet except pull down walls. I'm still deciding if it'll be worth it to have it done.
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2012
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