Venting drainage system in cottage

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by lardlad, Jul 1, 2007.

  1. lardlad

    lardlad New Member

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    Apr 28, 2007
    Our family cottage had to be moved back from the lake bluff due to erosion several years back and they moved it over the septic tank. My Grandfather took care of refitting the drainage system after the move. There is one large (4"?) PVC drain from the toilet a branch that comes in from the kitchen sink and one that comes from bathroom sink. The large soil pipe goes directly into the septic tank. All of this is open under the cottage in a crawl space. I don't see any vent and I do notice odors under the cottage, low toilet bowl water and gurgling in my kitchen sink vent after flushing. I'm assuming this is a venting problem. We just got a new well and have been enjoying being able to flush the toilet on a regular basis, wash dishes, shave etc. (the simple things of life). So I'm assuming the increased water flow and usage has kicked up the odor and the problem.
    I've read about vents that can be hooked directely to the waste pipe with a one way valve rather than go to a stack up through the roof, can you vent an entire system this way? Where would the "sewer" gas go, doesn't that need a way out into the atmosphere? Also, Could I just tap into the one big line as it enters the septic with 1 1/2 PVC and go out through the foundation up along the chimney and vent up the roof as is normally done, or am I simplifying this too much?
     
  2. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

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    Yakima WA
    I believe you have some very serious problems here. The house should not be over the septic tank in the first place. Do you have traps on the drains? The air admittance vents, aka Studor, can not be the only drain in a system. There must be at least one vent to the outside. Most plumber shy away from them anyway because they are mechanical devices that can/will fail. I would strongly recommend you contact a licensed plumber to assess your problems. Do not call Grandpa.
     
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  4. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

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    What do you mean by "all of this is open"? Can you see into the septic tank? If so, that definitely needs to be sealed.

    That is believable, and you are going to have to do something about that:

    Yes, very possibly.

    You are possibly overloading the septic system, and that would be an additional problem.

    I am not a real plumber, but I would still say "No." That kind of vent is sometimes used near the trap of a single fixture, but only to protect that particular trap from siphoning.

    Yes ... when you flush, the displaced air in the system must go somewhere.

    Your overall theory is fine there, but that vent should be at least 2" or even bigger if exposed to freezing weather ... and like Gary said, you really should have a plumber come take a good look. For the price of an estimate or even a service call, s/he should be able and willing to tell you exactly what is going on, what is needed and to alert you to any applicable codes, restrictions or other requirements.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2007
  5. lardlad

    lardlad New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2007
    venting

    I have two "Schimpke tanks" in tandem, basically two 4 x 4 concrete tanks with a heavy circular concrete lid. Only the lids are visible. They shouldn't be under the cottage, correct, but they are so I'm stuck with it. Grandpa has long left this mortal coil so it's up to me to figure a way out of the mess. The draings all have traps but no vents anywhere.I think I'll try to do a 2" vent off the main and take it out the back up above the roof line. Can't be any worse than it is now. I'm afraid if I have a plumber out he'll tell me I'm breaking all sorts of codes and won't want to touch a thing. I'll give one a call though and see what they say.
     
  6. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

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    vents

    If the traps do not have individual vents, then a vent off the main line will do absolutely nothing to prevent them from siphoning.
     
  7. GrumpyPlumber

    GrumpyPlumber Licensed Grump

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    True, consider mechanical venting the individual traps... beats the alternative.
     
  8. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

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    disabled-retired industrial fabricator
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    200 miles south of Little Rock
    The low toilet bowl water after flushing *could* be a siphon problem, but the odors under the cottage and the gurgling in the kitchen after a toilet flush are most likely caused by the main line and tank not being vented and leaving the displaced air in the system nowhere to go, correct? And if so, then the toilet bowl is *not* being siphoned since the water has to push its way into the line and tank (thereby causing the gurgling in the kitchen).

    So yes, codes say the fixtures should be vented, but individual fixture-trap vents will not take care of the objectionable symptoms actually being described.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2007
  9. GrumpyPlumber

    GrumpyPlumber Licensed Grump

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    Putting a vent on the kitchen sink trap will stop it from gurgling when the toilet is flushed.
    I've seen it work...though I am NOT a fan of mechanical venting, they do have a tendancy to fail IF they are the spring type...Studor vents are more reliable.
    This guy has the alternative of either ripping open walls, or finding closets to run vents through.
    If his local code allows it, I'd suggest it.
     
  10. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    Joined:
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    Occupation:
    disabled-retired industrial fabricator
    Location:
    200 miles south of Little Rock
    Yes, I was wrong: an open vent line there (or at any fixture) would take care of air trying to escape from a system that is otherwise closed, as well as to protect the trap from any possible siphoning (which does not seem to be a problem here).

    That kind of vent would *not* relieve the pressure-gurgling being experienced.

    As an alternative to what he has planned, yes, he could do that if he ultimately discovers he also has a siphoning problem.
     
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