Using a Sump Pump to pump up hill to the town sewer

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by Bwjones, Dec 5, 2013.

  1. Bwjones

    Bwjones New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Jena, LA
    I have a question, we've been living in our house for over 5 years now and keep having trouble with our sump pump either burning up or check valves being broken. We was told when we bought the house it needed a sump pump since it has to pump the sewage up hill to the town sewer, which is about 150-200'. Come to find out we didn't realize we were tied into our neighbors line and everything had started backing up into our line then our yard, due to it being to much pressure. So about six months ago we had a plumber come in & run our own line, we were told it had to be a 2" line due to the sump pump wouldn't work correctly otherwise. Also, when running the new line they had to put about 3 90s in it due to our neighbor not letting us have a straight shot through their yard. So now after installing a new line and another new sump pump 6 months later it's bubbling up and looks to be having trouble again. I'm not where I can check it out myself at the moment, so I don't know yet if the check valves had to much pressure on them then busted then caused the pump to run continuesly or what? Hopefully the plumber will be able to check it out as soon as possible.

    My question is what could we do that would be better?

    We don't have enough yard for a treatment plant and there isn't another alternative to going up hill, we was told a cutter pump would work and wouldn't last.

    Your help would be GREATLY appreciated!!
  2. wallskev

    wallskev New Member

    Messages:
    72
    Location:
    North Carolina,USA
  3. Tom Sawyer

    Tom Sawyer In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,268
    Location:
    Maine
    Sump pumps are not designed to pump sewage.
  4. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,672
    Location:
    IL
    Just some thoughts...

    1. You will want to provide vertical rise is that pump pumping to the people sizing your pump for you, in addition to your pipe size and distances.

    2. How much does the town charge you to accept your sewage?

    3. Do you have enough land to put in a septic field? That might be $8000 or more, so it is probably not the economic solution... depending on town charges.

    I don't know if it is practical to put in a pressure gauge for the output of your new pump, but it would seem useful to diagnose changes in the future. You might detect clogs before the became total, for example. I don't have any experiences with this stuff.
  5. Tom Sawyer

    Tom Sawyer In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,268
    Location:
    Maine
    He just needs the right pump and the right check valve. A pressure gauge won't tell him anything of use.
  6. Bwjones

    Bwjones New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Jena, LA
    Check Valves

    Any recomendations on a good check valve that'll last?

    Should I get one that I could inspect pretty easily?

    Is there any that are easily replaced?
  7. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,387
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    As already pointed out, if you are truly using a "sump pump", you are using the wrong thing. You need a pump that is designed to pump sewage. Perhaps you are just confused on the correct name of the devise you are using??? It might be wise to consult a local plumbing contractor to get your system working correctly.
  8. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,672
    Location:
    IL
    Zoeller is another good name in pumps and check valves, but I don't have specific hardware recommendations. I don't have experience in these, but I have friends who speak well of them. http://www.zoellerpumps.com/ProductByCategory.aspx?CategoryID=1 They have dimensions and horsepower and more on their site. The stronger pumps use 240 volts.

    Wallskev suggested a pump maker and and that they could suggest a specific model based on your numbers. Point out what you had used before and that those had proved very inadequate.

    I do recommend a gate valve after the check valve, to make repairs easier and more tolerable.

    Your pump needs to go into a sealed pit, and that pit needs to be vented through the roof if the pit is in the basement. The size of your pit will also have to be considered in that the pump will have to fit. You may need to upgrade your pit.
  9. Bwjones

    Bwjones New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Jena, LA
    Sump Pump vs. Cutter Pump (grinder pump)

    If the (Big Giant) Sump Pump that is already installed turns out to be burnt up. I'm planning on going replacing it with a cutter pump, going by all the different comments, including yours, that's what I should of had in the 1st place.

    On my last question, I was just asking for different opinions on a good check valve.

    Thanks,
    Jones
  10. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    Are you pumping raw sewage from a sump or are you pumping black water from the end of a septic tank? You do not need a "cutter" unless you are pumping heavy solids, and my guess is that you are short-cycling an undersized pump and/or that your septic tank needs a thorough cleaning. However, those 90s in that line are not good and you need someone to do a thorough assessment of your overall system now that you know mere situation management is a life-long battle.
  11. Bwjones

    Bwjones New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Jena, LA
    I am pumping raw sewage straight to the Town's sewage line, I don't have a septic tank just the small tank the pump is in. Thanks for the input.
  12. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    The size of that tank is short-cycling your pump, and you definitely need a sewage pump to extract the waste from that sump. Ideally, however, the sewage from your home would gravity-flow into a properly-sized septic tank dumping into at least a 500-gallon tank where a black-water pump would run for an hour or so every once in a while. That is what I would do, but I would at least get your current sump up to around 50 gallons or so in order to extend the life of your next pump.
Similar Threads: Using Sump
Forum Title Date
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Gurgling after using bathroom sinks - venting question! (pic attached) Aug 19, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Is my water filter housing prone to cracking? Aug 9, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Using PEX for first time, eye wash station Jun 25, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Grunfos Comfort Recirculating Pump Causing Loud Clicking in Pipe May 16, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice HELP! Solder nightmare - using wrong solution? Apr 29, 2014

Share This Page