Typical drain pipe size for IPC code?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by Mudball, Aug 23, 2009.

  1. Mudball

    Mudball New Member

    Messages:
    84
    Location:
    TN
    I was going to use 1-1/2" drain pipe for sinks, tub/shower, utility sink, and washing machine drain that will all lead into the 4" drain. My question is should I use a larger diameter like 2" or will the 1-1/2" be just fine ?

    IPC Plumbing Code
    International Plumbing Code
    http://www.internationalcodes.net/2009-international-plumbing-codes-100-2047-09.shtml

    Georgia's Construction Codes
    Mandatory Code:
    Georgia State Minimum Standard Mechanical Code (International Mechanical Code with Georgia State Amendments)
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 23, 2009
  2. FloridaOrange

    FloridaOrange Plumbing Designer

    Messages:
    1,317
    Location:
    SW Florida
    1-1/2" will work for sinks. In some newer codes the washing machine must be a 3" drain with a 2" trap.
  3. Mudball

    Mudball New Member

    Messages:
    84
    Location:
    TN
    That sounds great. Thanks for the heads up and even though we are not subject to plumbing codes (other than septic) I want the person doing the work to make sure its done right thus all my dumb questions to make sure they do so.

    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 23, 2009
  4. SewerRatz

    SewerRatz Illinois Licensed Plumber

    Messages:
    1,706
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    Are you in the United States? If so you do have a plumbing code to follow. Your state may not have their own code, but they do follow one of the many codes out there. It could be IRC, BOCA, UPC, what ever building code your state follows.

    It really amazes me when people post there is no plumbing code for them to follow, or they do not have to follow a code, due to they are doing their own work, or they are so far out in a rural area there are no inspectors. What do you think the guys building homes in your area follow? Or do you really think they just do it how they fell it should be done?

    Please do not take this as a personal attack or anything. I just want you to realize there is a code out there you should be following. If your locality doesn't have an inspector, then check with your county, and if they do not have one I guarantee you there is a state inspector that will be more than happy to inspect the plumbing in your area. I have had state inspectors on my job site for a few different reasons(local inspector interrupting the code wrong, or the lack of a local inspector).
  5. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,308
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    I think the thing you must realize is that codes are not troublesome roadblocks designed to cause tradesmen and homeowners grief. They are there to protect your health and safety. Consider some of the third worlds countries that have no plumbing codes. Sewage contaminates the water, stench from untrapped drains is common, electrical connections are fires waiting to happen, and on and on. We DIYers often don't realize the whys of many of the requirements, but there are reasons behind them. I would encourage you to find out what codes your area operates under and make sure your job is done properly.
  6. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    14,794
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    You are not even close on your sizing.
    I suggest you talk to your local plumbing inspector, where you are buying your plumbing permit.
    If you live in the State of Georgia, then it's mandatory that you have a plumbing permit.
  7. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,292
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    drains

    Codes are a minimum acceptable installation. I NEVER install drain lines less than 2" regardless of what the code would allow.
  8. nhmaster

    nhmaster Master Plumber

    Messages:
    3,189
    Location:
    S. Maine
    I like the way you think :D
  9. Mudball

    Mudball New Member

    Messages:
    84
    Location:
    TN
    I sure didnt mean to stir up a hornets nest. Just for the record I live in a rural area in central TN. Our county just recently voted in and passed some good building codes and badly needed regulations that now people MUST build from. We were grandfathered in because we started building our house before they passed the codes and regulations. I hate to admit it but we could have a plumber install 1/4" drain lines and we and/or they do NOT have to follow any codes or regulations and so we would be screwed. Im sure that we would have problems if we went that small but that is exactly why Im here and what I thought this forum was for...to ask questions about situations such as ours because I do care about trying to get it done right and we DO have jack-legs out here that will slap in anything they want and tell you that its just fine. I dont know if Im going to have time to sit down and read all the plumbing codes when a simple question (I thought) might have a simple answer. Im sorry if my response of the FACT that we are not subject to codes/regulations/inspectors/permits offended anyone. Im trying to better educate myself to make sure that at least one of the many different plumbers I get quotes from are going to (I hope) do the job right.
    Thanks for posting the codes for me and I do like the response about going to a minimum of 2" regardless of codes. I would rather be safe than sorry if cost difference is not that great. Again I just want to make sure the job is done right. I now will also have to find out who our new plumbing inspector is now that we have one and see if he will help me because I didnt think of that until these responses.
    Thanks for all the help.
  10. SewerRatz

    SewerRatz Illinois Licensed Plumber

    Messages:
    1,706
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    If you ask any Chicago plumber what sizes he uses for DWV, he will always tell you 2" and 4" period. There is no 3", or 1 1/2".
  11. nhmaster

    nhmaster Master Plumber

    Messages:
    3,189
    Location:
    S. Maine
    Chigago, Chicago that toddling town.... :D

    Where men are men and plumbers are plumbers.
  12. Mudball

    Mudball New Member

    Messages:
    84
    Location:
    TN
    That sounds good I like the idea of keeping it even number and keeping it simple as possible.
    DWV = ?
    drain, water, vent ?
    Im trying to act as a general contractor through this slow building process and it is really good to educate myself as much as time will allow me to do for each different building project/profession and the contractors that I talk to can tell it when I meet with them and it seems to help keep them straight.
    Right now Im drawing up the measurements of where the sink,tub/shower, utility sink, washing machine will be located.
  13. Mudball

    Mudball New Member

    Messages:
    84
    Location:
    TN
    My profile says Atlanta GA :confused:
    I kept wondering why GA plumbing codes were posted. Its even more strange that I never entered that into my profile to begin with.
    Well at least it allowed me to change and correct it
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2009
  14. krow

    krow Plumber

    Messages:
    906
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Drains, Wastes and vents

    but that was close
  15. Redwood

    Redwood Master Plumber

    Messages:
    7,453
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Pretty much everywhere in the us has a code to follow...
    So I great the codes? we don't have no stinkin codes?
    Withe just a touch of skepticism...

    If you don't want codes better move south of the border!:cool:
  16. 3m

    3m New Member

    Messages:
    76
    Location:
    NY
    If a house is grandfathered in its the old plumbing and electric that they are talking about, the one thing that most people dont understand is when you start remodeling you must bring everything up to the new codes. Some things are imposssible like the framing and the inspector will take that into consideration, but if new plumbing or electricity is installed it must be installed according to the local codes and the building authority that nis in effect at the time of the remodeling project
  17. Mudball

    Mudball New Member

    Messages:
    84
    Location:
    TN
    PLEASE !!!!
    Someone please tell me what it is that I said wrong so I can correct myself.
    I didnt say I dont want to follow any codes...EVER.
    I thought this was a good place to ask questions because it said the name of this site is " Terry Loves & Remodel DIY forum "
    DIY = Do it yourself
    Please read the second statement I made on this thread which clearly states that we are not subject to plumbing codes so I want to make sure its done right. I can not help it if there is not a law enforcing these codes and this is exactly why Im here.
  18. Mudball

    Mudball New Member

    Messages:
    84
    Location:
    TN
    Yes sir you are exactly right. I was just talking to the wife a few minutes ago and we are going to make some phone calls in the next few days to find out what the plumbing codes are in our area to follow and to see who our new inspector is. Like I told her though they might not be much to welcome us help since weve been grandfathered in and havent paid for a permit but we will see. Im paying for these steps to be done correctly and thats the way I want it done.
    Thanks for the help.
  19. sjsmithjr

    sjsmithjr Geologist

    Messages:
    295
    Location:
    Knoxville, Tennessee
    I just noticed that you are in Tennessee and under the heading of "better late than never".

    1. Yes, Tennessee is under the IPC. There may be local amendments or preferences.

    • Sad but true, there are counties in Tennessee where there are no code inspections or enforcement with the exception of electrical. Electrical code enforcement and inspections are handled by state inspectors, not local.

    This can get confusing for someone outside of the building trades. By state law you are subject to a plumbing code. The state, however, leaves inspection and enforcement up to the local governments, which sometimes do not have the resources to enforce the code. Think of it this way - you're driving down a road with a 45 mph speed limit. Just because there's not a law enforcement officer around to check your speed doesn't mean there's not a speed limit in place.

    If the newly minted plumbing inspector can't help you out, you may want to look into bringing in a third party to perform the inspections for you.

    Good luck!
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2009
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