Type of valve

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by Pytheas, Oct 26, 2009.

  1. Pytheas

    Pytheas New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    NC
    I recently replaced all the parts in the back of toilet, once I did that the toilet supply valve started to leak. The valve probably hasnt been turned in 10+ years and needs replacement, however I'm unsure as to the type of valve it is.

    Can you guys tell what type of shutoff valve this is?

    [​IMG]
  2. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    It is a 3/8" outlet angle valve, and it is soldered to that copper pipe. You might want to have a plumber replace it. However, there is room to cut the copper right at the valve, clean it up with emory, and install a 5/8 compression inlet valve.
  3. Pytheas

    Pytheas New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    NC
    How reliable are the compression fittings? It wont just blow off the end of the pipe one day will it?

    Are new houses being built exclusively with these compression type fittings?

    Also, how can you tell that this valve is soldered on? Is it the discoloration on the copper?

    Reason I'm asking all this stuff is:
    I will eventually be redoing 2 of the bathrooms in my house and I'm curious as to the best trade practices.

    Thanks so much!
  4. Runs with bison

    Runs with bison Member

    Messages:
    892
    Location:
    Midwest
    Where is it leaking? If it is leaking around the stem (versus leaking through the line when shutoff) then tightening that big packing nut usually does the trick. Otherwise, you will need to follow Jimbo's course.
  5. Pytheas

    Pytheas New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    NC
    Its leaking where the handle screws into the fitting. Does that make sense?
  6. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,689
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    valve

    WE can tell it is soldered on because there is nothing else to hold it to the pipe. I would unsolder the valve and use a compression type. You might have enough pipe once you cut the valve off, but if not you will create a problem for yourself.
  7. Pytheas

    Pytheas New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    NC
    I'd like to thank everyone for your quick replies and advice.

    Just answer these 2 last questions for me and I will be good to go *crossing fingers*

    1. How reliable are the compression fittings? It wont just blow off the end of the pipe one day will it?

    2. Are new houses being built exclusively with these compression type fittings?
  8. Runs with bison

    Runs with bison Member

    Messages:
    892
    Location:
    Midwest
    That's good news. It's a simple packing leak. That big nut that the stem and handle stick through should be tightened until the leak stops. If it hasn't been tightened before, and hasn't been leaking a long time then this usually does the trick. You shouldn't have to turn it far before you feel it start to tighten up. Note: after doing this you will likely find the handle is harder to turn than before, because the packing is pressing harder against the stem.

    When you tighten that nut it compresses the packing. The packing is pressed harder against the stem sealing the leak. If it has been leaking for a long time then hard deposits or scoring might prevent the packing from sealing the leak. Or if it has leaked a time or two and been tightened each time, you might not have much adjustment left to the packing nut.
  9. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,351
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    Compression fittings are very reliable and will not blow off the pipe. You can tell the existing valve is soldered because that shiny color is solder. The big nut the stem runs through is call as packing nut. Packing is a string like material that keeps the water from leaking around the stem. Often when there is a leak at that spot, simply tightening the packing nut a little will compress the packing and stop the leak. The packing can be replaced, but it's usually easier just to install a new valve. There are new ones that require only 1/4 turn. Compression fittings are the standard method used by plumbers.
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2009
  10. Cass

    Cass Plumber

    Messages:
    5,980
    Location:
    Ohio
    If it is 10 years old there is a good chance you can buy another valve and replace the stem leaving the valve body on the copper....dry everything before you do it and put some silicone on all threads...
  11. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,059
    Location:
    New England
    As with anything, there's a right way and a wrong way to install it. If a compression fitting is installed properly, it makes a very secure connection, and it won't come off the pipe. In both new and replacement work, the ratio of compression to solder is probably 20:1.

    To use a compression fitting, you'd need to clean the end of the pipe well so it is smooth and no lumps of solder so the compression ring would make a good seal.
  12. Pytheas

    Pytheas New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    NC
    Thanks to everyone for ALL your insight. Its much appreciated.

    I will try and tighten the "packing nut" (thanks Gary for the terminology). If that doesnt work I will install a new valve!

    Once again...thanks.
  13. Pytheas

    Pytheas New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    NC
    Thanks jadnashua, I will keep that in mind if I have to replace the valve.
  14. Pytheas

    Pytheas New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    NC
    Tightening the Packing Nut did the trick. No more dripping!

    However, the supply valve has started to make that loud hammering noise when filling the tank :( The noise goes away when I crank open the valve.

    Is air getting in there? Should I just go and replace it with a compression valve?
  15. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,059
    Location:
    New England
    Shutoffs should always be fully open. That's a common thing with that type of valve when it gets old...the washer starts to harden and vibrate. 1/4-turn valves don't have a washer, so they work better longer.
  16. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,689
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    valve

    Here the ratio of compression to solder it 100:0. You cannot even buy a solder angle stop, because no one carries them. And you answered your own two questions. IF they did blow off, they would not be the standard in new construction, would they?
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