Tub removed, bringing out new questions/issues

Discussion in 'Shower & Bathtub Forum & Blog' started by RCraig, Apr 27, 2014.

  1. RCraig

    RCraig New Member

    Messages:
    126
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    Thanks for all the advice - in response to my previous post about a shifty tub that leaked into the basement when and only when someone took a shower.

    The tub is out! Two observations relevant to the leak that it haunted me with:
    1. The tub lies between the wall of the bathroom and the linen closet. Little did I realize it, but there actually was not properly enough length for a tub. The way the original builders of the house made it work was to cut chunks out of the beams of the walls. In other words, the wall at the front of the tub - the 2-by-4s or whatever those vertical pieces of wood are - had chunks cut out of them. The same at the back of the tub. These chunks cut out of the wood were the only way to get a standard size tub into the space between the wall and the linen closet.

    2. The old tub had no front flange.

    NEW QUESTIONS:

    Now what to do?

    Here are the possibilities as suggested to me by carpenter and plumber:

    i. Move wall of linen closet over 3''. This would allow a standard size tub to fit between the 2 walls.

    ii. Get a non-standard smaller sized tub which would properly fit in the space available.

    Any thoughts or advice anyone might have would be very gratefully appreciated and probably heeded.
  2. dj2

    dj2 Member

    Messages:
    425
    Location:
    California
    I would move the wall.
  3. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,150
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    They make 54" and 60" tubs.
    I would move the wall.
  4. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,183
    Location:
    New England
    I may be in the minority, but I like to soak in a hot tub...it makes my back feel much better! Don't go with a 54" tub, they're a joke unless you only bath small children or are a dwarf or only use it as a shower, then, maybe forget the tub and make it a shower only. Even a 60" tub is short for most typical Americans. When I remodeled, I ended up with a 72" tub, and would really have liked an 80" one but wasn't willing to move the wall 6"!

    If those walls are load bearing, it might warrant some reinforcement. If not, it's probably not a big deal, except if you are planning to tile the walls, then reinforcing them is a really good idea.
  5. RCraig

    RCraig New Member

    Messages:
    126
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    ok, I think I have to go with the clear majority and move the wall. Good point, I will check out whether the wall is load bearing, also it will definitely be tiled because the showerhead comes out of that wall. Might I ask what is meant by reinforcement for the wall, before tiling.

    One consequence that I didn't mention in my original post is that, by moving the wall, I will definitely qualify for a World-wide title for the dinkiest linen closet on the face of the earth. It was already minuscule.

    Much appreciation, and any more thoughts will also be cogitated upon.
  6. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,183
    Location:
    New England
    You may be able to use some studs sideways, and if you can, you might put a layer of ply in there, and, you might be able to saw a slot through the deeper ones and put in a cross-brace. Gluing things with construction adhesive ties things together much stronger than just nails alone, and something like deck screws won't back out like a nail. This is probably best addressed by consulting a structural engineer.
  7. RCraig

    RCraig New Member

    Messages:
    126
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    That sounds like a very good idea, putting the wall studs in using the short side of the board. In other words, the vertical boards that hold up the wall would be placed such that the wall wasn't as thick.

    Not sure what is meant by "the deeper ones"?

    Thanks, carpenter coming back today.
    Ruth
  8. RCraig

    RCraig New Member

    Messages:
    126
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    What about this idea:
    Lyons IndustriesVictory 4.5 ft. Left Drain Soaking Tub in White
    Description:

    The Victory bathtub is great for a small space or a mobile home. You still have the luxury of a full size acrylic bathtub with lumbar support. The overflow hole is not drilled. Our innovative apron design allows water to drain away from apron corners. For maximum support we include 3 in. diameter feet, 7/16 in. O.S.B. and fiberglass to fully support the bathtub.
  9. johnfrwhipple

    johnfrwhipple Bathroom Design & Build - North Vancouver, B.C.

    Messages:
    4,547
    Location:
    North Vancouver, BC
    I hate long tubs myself. Anything over 5' is a waste unless it has a built in butt rest. When you soak "Deeper" means more water. You could say higher sides as well.

    Compare the height - width and location of over flow to see if you can fit in.

    I always tell people they should never buy a tub they have not climbed inside. Never.

    My daughter's tub looks like a regular tub but is a version of a Japanese Soaker. 34" wide. 60" long. 24" deep.

    [​IMG]

    Custom LED lighting is my design!
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2014
  10. RCraig

    RCraig New Member

    Messages:
    126
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    Beautiful! I will definitely move the wall, although mine will likely not look at fantastic as that one. Ruth
  11. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,183
    Location:
    New England
    My ideal soaking tub has me laying with my legs straight, my back at a slight incline with my head just above the water...that takes a long tub. Shorter, deeper ones just aren't as comfortable when trying to relax your back to me. So, it's a good idea to get into the tub for fit before you commit. SOme use nearly vertical sides, and I find those particularly uncomfortable. A really deep one can be problematic getting into and out of - safety bars may end up being required and potentially steps, which can complicate things, and may not work in a smaller room. Unless you have an unlimited budget, choose your must haves and work from there.
  12. johnfrwhipple

    johnfrwhipple Bathroom Design & Build - North Vancouver, B.C.

    Messages:
    4,547
    Location:
    North Vancouver, BC
    Thanks Ruth. The LED is a an easy touch.

    Make sure you get in the tub you buy before you buy it.

    What size is your hot water tank? You might need a larger one if you pick a tub too big.

    five feet is the perfect size for a tub. I'm 6'1" my wife is 5'6" and my kids are little. We all love it.
  13. RCraig

    RCraig New Member

    Messages:
    126
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    My problem is the small total square footage available in the bathroom. The largest size tub I can have is 5 feet, and that is requiring a lot of work to get a few extra inches to have enough space for the 5 foot tub to fit lengthwise.

    Another slight problem surfaced in that apparently the floor isn't completely level. Also another question came into my mind in that I am wondering whether there is something I can put in under the tub, to minimize potential water damage. The whole thing started with a mysterious water leak into the basement occuring when someone took a shower. That is why the old tub was removed and everything is being torn up at the moment.
  14. johnfrwhipple

    johnfrwhipple Bathroom Design & Build - North Vancouver, B.C.

    Messages:
    4,547
    Location:
    North Vancouver, BC
    Ruth it might have only been a fault in the wall design or maybe a fault with the shower fixture.

    Who took the shower? Was it maybe just a shower curtain issue?

    An unlevel floor is not such a big problem to deal with.
  15. queen50

    queen50 Member

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    40
    Location:
    Washington state
  16. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,183
    Location:
    New England
    Leveling the tub is critical, otherwise, it can overcome the tiling flange (shouldn't if you do it right, but...) or run out, if it tilts into the room. Proper handling of the tub/wall seam is also critical, or you could get some wicking. A surface membrane, sealed to the top edge of the tub, when done right, makes the tub/wall joint totally waterproof, so then, it's only tilt that might allow it to run out into the room, and down the edges of the tub. Lots of products that you can use for surface membranes - if you choose one, make sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions to the letter.

    IF you aren't planning on leveling the whole room (tile needs flat, level is nice but not required), and even if not, you may find setting the tub into piles of mortar is the easiest way to both support it and hold it level. If you ensure your ledger boards are level, you can just plop the thing in place until it settles onto the ledger boards, smashing the piles of mortar enough to then hold it there once it cures.
  17. RCraig

    RCraig New Member

    Messages:
    126
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    Very good information, thanks so much. Might I ask what a surface membrane, sealed to the top edge of the tub, is?
    Lack of flange, tilt, and possibly wicking were all contributing to my problem. I don't want to recreate the same conditions. Having lived with only the bathroom in the basement for over a week, and not sure when I will have my upstairs bathroom back, I want to solve this problem.
    Thanks again, Ruth
  18. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,183
    Location:
    New England
  19. johnfrwhipple

    johnfrwhipple Bathroom Design & Build - North Vancouver, B.C.

    Messages:
    4,547
    Location:
    North Vancouver, BC

    Solid Backing LOL - Why not just say Dry Wall.

    Video shows the dry wall not screwed off properly. Shows a KB niche installed without proper washers. And first demo shows no lapping of the Kerdi Band to the tub deck???

    Pretty poor showing Jim.
  20. RCraig

    RCraig New Member

    Messages:
    126
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    REALLY NEED ADVICE, RE CHIP in newly installed tub

    Actually, for someone who knows nothing about the topic, the youtube video was quite interesting, despite potential flaws. I think that if I had had membrane put under the tile when it was done a while back (to little avail), it might have made a big difference.

    Questions about membrane: I am just going to put tile on the 3 walls of the shower. The tile will go up to about 1 foot from the ceiling. Should/can I use membrane although it is not a "surround" type thing?

    FURTHER IMPORTANT QUESTION: I discovered yesterday that the new tub that was just mudded in has a chip in it. The chip is large (I would say 1 inch by 2 inches). It is on the upper edge of the front flange. It was camouflaged because there was a bar code over it, and a piece of plastic over the flange. A large piece of the shiny surface is not attached to the tub but chipped off, and one can see the fibers underneath.

    NOT Happy at all about this. This is exactly where the previous tub was leaking from.
    Last edited: May 6, 2014
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