This washer drain is not right, correct?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by Pickngrin, Oct 28, 2013.

  1. Pickngrin

    Pickngrin New Member

    Messages:
    54
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    I just moved into a temporary rental which advertised laundry hookups. The duplex was completely rebuilt and the hookups had not been used. Pictures of the room are posted below. There is no standpipe. I told the property management company that there is no way for me to drain the washer and they forwarded me a response from the contractor who build it claiming that it is to code (????) and that it has to be that height. I explained to the property manager that the water will pour right down on the washer, creating an electrical hazard. I just emailed pictures to her and told her that no, I am not willing to pay a "handyman" to come do a washer setup, that I am capable of installing a washing machine when there is a legitimate drain. I just spoke to my neighbor, who said that they have a vertical pipe extending up from that horizontal PVC pipe. This is what he told the property manager in email today:
    "The drain for the laundry is at the height it is for a purpose and to code. Remember, we had to have every thing inspected. If the drain was put down low #1 You could not get at it,#2 The water pressure coming out of the washer would cause it to splash out. The water from a washer has the power to pump up to 30 feet"
    This doesn't sound right to me.
    Any feedback would be appreciated.

    [​IMG]




    Thanks,
    PnG
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 29, 2013
  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,896
    Location:
    New England
    Without seeing what's behind the wall, there's no way to tell for sure, but unless there's another outlet to the sewer lower than what's shown, there's no way it could work...water doesn't go uphill. Yes, the WM has a pump, but you can't legally connect it directly into the sewer such that its pump could do it. You need a standpipe (could be one in the wall), a trap, and a vent - then, it can keep going to the sewer via gravity. In some places, it MIGHT still be legal to run a WM to its own drywell, but that's becoming a thing of the past.

    Then, what is that copper pipe doing? Is that just an open T, and it's draining into there? Don't think that will meet any code, plus, you can't get a good seal so you'd have sewer gasses and if there was a backup, an opening for it to spew all over the basement.
  3. Reach4

    Reach4 Active Member

    Messages:
    2,077
    Location:
    IL
  4. Pickngrin

    Pickngrin New Member

    Messages:
    54
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Thanks for the input. I am livid. I knew this was completely wrong but I needed some confirmation. I sent pics to the property manager, who sent them to the contractor. He is supposed to come tomorrow. On top of all of the stress of having just moved (and having laundry hookups was one of my main criteria), I am now dealing with this ridiculous drain situation.
  5. guy48065

    guy48065 New Member

    Messages:
    111
    Location:
    SE and north MI
    Don't I see a drain in the floor of that washer hookup box? Maybe your basement has an ejector pump.
  6. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,488
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    The piping you show is completely wrong for a washer connection, if that is what it was for. Unless there is a sump pump somewhere, that we cannot see. That system is a recipe for disaster, even if they do install a "P" trap and riser. In addition, that is a cleanout tee which should have a plug in it, NOT a drain hose from somewhere.
  7. Pickngrin

    Pickngrin New Member

    Messages:
    54
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    The "plumber" came back today (I was not present) and here is a picture (below) of what he did. I know that is not right. And, of course, it runs over (I did a test). I left a voice mail for the property manager this evening and told her there is no way that will pass inspection. I am fit to be tied. Thanks again for the input, and for tolerating my venting.

    [​IMG]
  8. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,329
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    That's not right either. In your state, you are not allowed to DIY plumbing, so you should insist a licensed plumber be hired to properly clean this mess up. I would bet money the "contractor" is NOT a licensed plumber.
  9. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,488
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    It overflows because the riser is too short AND he connected the 2" P-trap to a piece of 1 1/2" piping, and ANY "reputable" plumber knows you NEVER reduce pipe sizes in the direction of the flow. Your "plumber" is really a "Tinker Jackleg" handyman.
  10. Pickngrin

    Pickngrin New Member

    Messages:
    54
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    I suppose that it is time to call the town inspector.
  11. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    14,891
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    [​IMG]

    Zoeller makes a laundry basin with pump.
    The output from this basin and pump uses a check valve, and then you can pipe and pump directly to the 2" and skip the p-trap.
  12. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,488
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    qutoe; I suppose that it is time to call the town inspector.

    It may be, if he even wants to get involved. In fact, he may find that your "plumber" was not a real plumber, but he should require that it be done correctly.
  13. Pickngrin

    Pickngrin New Member

    Messages:
    54
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    contractor and plumber came this morning

    They showed up today and claimed that it was a kinked washer drain hose that was at (my) fault (although they are the ones that placed the hose in that pipe. He said that is what he is going to tell the landlord, and that I can argue about it with her. The contractor is pissed that I threatened to call the plumbing inspector -- I left him a message this morning -- and that I said this was not done to code. It turned into an argument. He wanted to know the phone number of the plumber who told me that this was not to code, and kept asking me. I told him that it was through photo and email, not over the phone. He again claimed that this was improved by the plumbing inspector. This makes no sense to me, because the supposed drain was not even in place whenever they would have supposedly had it inspected. I can't believe I am in this middle of this craziness. I will speak with the inspector when he returns my call, but I do not want to pay for any of this.
    Any more practical advice for how to handle this standoff?

    Thanks again for all input.

  14. jacobsond

    jacobsond DIY Junior Member

    Messages:
    59
    Location:
    ND
    It should be done correctly and arguing with the "plumber"sounds like its not going anywhere. Get it inspected even if its on your own dime.Be prepared to find a new place to live because your landlord is likely going to go with what the "plumber" says and might not want you as a tenant anymore. I repair appliances and I can see even if that's up to code its not going to work.The discharge from the washer will overflow that drain.
  15. Pickngrin

    Pickngrin New Member

    Messages:
    54
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    The inspector was just here. He said that there is no code violation. I didn't have to pay for the inspection. When I showed him a picture of what it looked like prior to this morning's pipe extension, he said that it was too short. He also agreed that the overflow problem had nothing to do with a "kinked drain hose" as the contractor claimed. I'm very surprised that it's not a code violation. But if I can do my laundry in the meantime, if the building floods after I've moved out, at least I had voiced my concerns.


  16. craigpump

    craigpump Member

    Messages:
    883
    Location:
    ct
    For shits and giggles, you should find out if the guy who actually did the work is a licensed plumber. Here in Ct you can get that info from the Dept of Consumer Protection web site.
  17. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,488
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    A kinked drain hose would slow down the washer's draining, but NOT cause an overflow. If the inspector approved that 1 1/2" intermediate pipe, then he was not any better than the "plumber" who did it, which is often the case when inspectors are "90 day wonders" who "know everything after a 3 months training".
  18. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,329
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    I find it ironic that your state will not allow DIY plumbing, but will approve a job like this.
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