Tankless Submersible Well Pump losing pressure

Discussion in 'Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog' started by twistedDNA, Jul 7, 2014.

  1. twistedDNA

    twistedDNA New Member

    Messages:
    8
    I replaced my old pump as it was barely giving me any pressure and it was very old. Before the new pump was dropped the 82 feet into the well casing I tested it above ground and it had a ton of pressure but there was also a slit in the pipe where it was leaking. I fixed that put the pump back in it had lots of pressure for 3 days then slowly started to lose pressure. I thought OK the pipe had split before maybe it split again or is leaking at the fittings or at the patch I put in. Bought new pipe to use but ran the new pump again above ground to check for leaks before I replaced the pipe and I can't find one and the pressure seems up to par. I have a leak somewhere but it only shows up after its in the ground. HELP!
  2. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,383
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    Submersible pumps don't lose prime, they pump the well dry. Submersibles don't gradually over three days lose pressure. You could be stopping up the intake screen gradually, or you have an enlarging slit in the pipe.
  3. twistedDNA

    twistedDNA New Member

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    8
  4. twistedDNA

    twistedDNA New Member

    Messages:
    8
    The pump DID lose pressure after 3 days or at least the pressure was greatly reduced by a leak somewhere, a leak that is giving me a headache. I have no pressure tank. The pump pulls the water to ground level and I water my plants then I turn it off. On the 1st day it had very good pressure almost too much. I added two hoses to release the pressure and it worked great. On the 4th day the pressure was much lower and lower yet as the days passed. I ran the pump again today above ground and the pipe split in another area so I'm going to replace the whole 82 feet then give it another go. The intake screen was fine. I've been using this well for over 15 years never had clogs in it.
  5. Reach4

    Reach4 Active Member

    Messages:
    1,926
    Location:
    IL
    If you run your sprinklers for a while, maybe the spot with the broken pipe will make a wet spot in the lawn. If you have one or more valves after your pressure gauge, closing that/those mostly would tell you which side of the valve the problem was.
  6. twistedDNA

    twistedDNA New Member

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    8
  7. twistedDNA

    twistedDNA New Member

    Messages:
    8
    I can't run the pump very long being out of the ground I put it in a garbage can full of water when it gets half full I have to shut it off or ruin the pump. This takes less than a minute its a 3/4 horse. I don't have a pressure gauge its just pump wire rope pipe with a spigot on the end.
  8. Reach4

    Reach4 Active Member

    Messages:
    1,926
    Location:
    IL
    If you can feed the water from the pump back into the garbage can, you will not run out of water. You can probably get a fitting that will adapt to a garden hose that you could use to pump back into the garbage can during testing.

    Regarding a pressure gauge, I presume you mean that you don't have a pressure gauge on your setup when you are using the garbage can. If you wanted to develop pressure, you would need a valve to let you throttle the flow. If you have no gauge in your normal setup, you could consider adding a gauge and a valve to your setup. Make sure not to totally close up the valve while the pump is running, because that would destroy the pump.

    Anyway, I think that odds are that the broken pipe is not down the well casing.
  9. twistedDNA

    twistedDNA New Member

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    8
  10. twistedDNA

    twistedDNA New Member

    Messages:
    8
    You are right the pipe broken is not down the casing because the whole rig is above ground. I had a hose running from my city water into the garbage can but I can't fill it up fast enough the pump is very efficient. Can we post images?. I really appreciate the help though! :)
  11. twistedDNA

    twistedDNA New Member

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    8
  12. Reach4

    Reach4 Active Member

    Messages:
    1,926
    Location:
    IL
    To post an image, keep it 800 pixels or smaller. Then click "Upload a File" button.
    To modify a posting that you made, you can click "Edit" at the bottom of the existing posting huge4.png
    Ahh.. I see you had figured out how to post pictures.

    I presume you are where it does not freeze. If that is the case, I would get a tee and put a pressure gauge on that. I would maybe put a boiler valve (hose tap) before the existing valve, and get a garden-hose thread pressure gauge. That way you could take the gauge inside for winter, and drain the plumbing as best you can. The new tap could help drain, but you would need to be able to drain down below the frost line. For monitoring pressure, hook up the pressure gauge. For testing pump flow, hook up a garden hose, and route the water into the garbage can or the well casing -- depending on where the pump is.

    For a pump, if there is little resistance, such as if there is a broken pipe on the output, then the pressure will stay low, even though the pump is working nicely.
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2014
  13. craigpump

    craigpump Member

    Messages:
    857
    Location:
    ct
    Last time I saw an eye hook in a well seal holding "safety rope" it rusted off and dropped the rope down around the pump.

    Word to the wise, throw the rope away!
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