Tank Sensors

Discussion in 'Electrical Forum discussion & Blog' started by aeacfm, Oct 17, 2010.

  1. aeacfm

    aeacfm New Member

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    water tank sensor works at 12 v

    what i studied in chemistry that water split at 1.23 v or mainly at 2.0 v at max
    so isnt that sensor harmful for water as it may make electroysis ?
    thanks in advance
  2. Thatguy

    Thatguy Homeowner

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    Maybe it works on AC. You have a schematic?
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2010
  3. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

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    I would rethink the idea that water "splits" at 2 volts. Batteries work because water acts as a conductor, allowing electrons to flow from cathode to anode.

    There are many ways for water level sensors to work, which do not involve contact of the water to the electric source> floats, capacitve sensors, dp sensors, etc. Do you have a spec sheet for the sensor?
  4. aeacfm

    aeacfm New Member

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    Location:
    egypt
    ok i will post the diagram
  5. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    Pure water isn't a conductor. Electrolosis requires a conductor, current, and electrodes. Now, perfectly pure water is hard to get, but still, most needs some help, and then the proper electrodes to produce the hydrogen and oxygen. Not something you generally have to worry about. Assuming (and that can be dangerous) the sensor is designed with any sense, all of the current will be within it, and it wouldn't matter if it ran on 1 volt or 1000 - none of it should leak and potentially result in electrolosis.
  6. Thatguy

    Thatguy Homeowner

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  7. aeacfm

    aeacfm New Member

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    ok,
    you said the key with the water conductivity , but drinking water is a good conductor the water you said bad conductor is the deionized water or simply distilled water which would be with TDS of 3 ppm or 10ppm on max.
    but drinking water is 250 ppm and may reach 500 ppm so it is good conductor
    the second thing is that
    if the voltage is DC , two electrodes found , more than 1.23 V supplied i am sure that water would be electrolysed but how much this is said by how much current you supply to it and time according to faradays law

    waiting reply
    thanks
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2010
  8. nukeman

    nukeman Nuclear Engineer

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    What type of sensor are you talking about? Temperature? Level? Conductivity? Mass?

    Then there are usually multiple ways to measure each of these parameters.
  9. aeacfm

    aeacfm New Member

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    Location:
    egypt
    water level
  10. nukeman

    nukeman Nuclear Engineer

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    Location:
    VA
    There are many ways to measure level. If you are talking about a conductivity probe or capacitance level sensor, it is often driven with AC and usually a high frequency. Ones that I have built were usually 10-20 kHz. You will usually have you calibrate these to a different form of level measurement (such as dp) since the water chemistry can change and that will change your measurement.

    Here are some of the many ways to measure liquid level:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Level_sensor
  11. aeacfm

    aeacfm New Member

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    Location:
    egypt
    so the key here that AC current used instead of DC current
  12. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    A dc current through a simple resistor could drive a meter, and the mechanism might be entirely out of the water except the float. You can't generalize and state any sensor would do what you are saying. It takes two electrodes, separated, and the ability to conduct between them through the water to power the breakdown of water. Done in the same tank if it occured, it might just rejoin into water rather than stay gasses, too. Current through the sensor probably would not create the conditions to produce electrolosis.
  13. aeacfm

    aeacfm New Member

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    Location:
    egypt

    i am sorry but i cant get what exactly you want to say
  14. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    It would be a rare water sensor that set up the conditions whereas it enabled electrolysis...and, if it was a commercial product, they would soon be out of business. 'Me thinks thou does protest too much', as Shakespeare once said.
  15. aeacfm

    aeacfm New Member

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    also, it may be like what i said with DC but with small value so make electrolysis is minimal , or AC current with any value and i think it is the first
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