Super Supreme G220 Tankless Water Heater

Discussion in 'Tankless Water Heater Forum' started by Chucky, Mar 20, 2013.

  1. Chucky

    Chucky New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Montreal
    Hello, I bought a G220 tankless water heather, made by supreme tankless water heaters. I’m having a problem that I hope someone can help me with. I installed the unit where the hot water tank was, when I run the water now with your tankless water heater, the closest bathroom gets full hot water no problems, but when I run the water in kitchen or other bathroom, I only get cold. The closest bathroom is about 12 feet away and the other one is about 25 feet away and kitchen about another 10 to 15 feet further. I’ve when through all the frenquently asked questions and the troubleshooting in the manual, everything seems to be ok. One thing that might be a problem is that the water main coming in to the house is 3/4†copper tubing, wich I reduced to 1/2†to go into the unit and then back out the unit with 1/2†also, then it feeds the closest bathroom direct with 1/2†tubing and that bathroom has no problems but right after it goes to the closest bathroom it splits off to feed the other bathroom the tubing goes up to 3/4" tubing and then goes back to 3/4†copper tubing to feed the other bathroom and kitchen, reducing to 1/2†at those locations though. I don’t know if this would be a factor in not getting hot water in the other bathroom and kitchen, but the tubing coming out of unit doesn’t even heat up at full pressure. If I reduce the water pressure at the faucets, the water will get hot, but as soon as I open the pressure back to full, it gets cold again. It’s as if the unit can’t keep up with the flow of water, but it can in the other bathroom. Unfortunetly I cannot change the 3/4†copper tubing, because this is a single floor home with no basement and the 3/4†tubing runs under the concret foundation. It won’t even give me hot water at the kitchen sink alone on full pressure. If anyone would have any suggestions, I would appreciate it.

    Thank you
    Chucky
  2. http://plumberindianapolis.com/

    I have Never heard of a Supreme..
    so where Is that brand sold at anyway??

    Ace hardware or Sams Club??


    please post some pictures of your install....

    I would love to see it...to figure out where the issue is

    thank you.


    ;)
  3. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,262
    Location:
    New England
    The only big issue with having transitions between 1/2" to 3/4" and maybe back again is restrictions in the flow and those 3/4" sections will contain more water that has to be flushed out. How long are you running the water, and how big of a demand on the actual hot water are you asking for? Most tankless systems require at least 1/2gpm flow through them to turn on. WHen you ask for hot water at those other locations and then go look at the thing, has it turned on? One of the big complaints on tankless systems is just expecting warm water at something like a vanity may never trigger the thing to turn on - those faucets are flow restricted, and then unless you select nearly all hot, may never get enough flow to turn it on, and then, depending on how hot you've set the thing, it may be too hot or no hot at all. Often, once triggered to turn on, you can lower the flow some, but it takes a learning curve to figure out what you need to make it work. To me, it's not worth the aggravation and the (often) considerable increase in infrastructure to install one.
  4. Chucky

    Chucky New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Montreal
    Tankless water heater

    IMG_0593.jpg IMG_0594.jpg IMG_0595.jpg

    So on the unit, cold ater in on right hand side, hot comes out on left side.
    Under unit, on right, on cold side, theres is a shut off valve. And on left, hot side a flow regulator.
    In other picture, pipes come out of concret foundation at 3/4", so lower pipe is cold, feeds small bathroom, with 1/2" pipes then continues to unit with 1/2" pipes. Top pipe comes from unit, supposed to be hot water, forks off to feed small bathroom with hot water, wich it does, abd then goes back to 3/4" pipe to feed the rest of the house, where at other bathroom and kitchen the pipes recude back to 1/2", but no hot water.

    Master plubmer Mark just search for Super Supreme G220 Tankless Water Heater and you'll find it.


    Jadnashua I'm not putting much demand on hot water, just trying to run the kitchen sink, i let it run for a log time, but never gets hot, unless i recude the flow to practicaly a trickle. The flow is plenty to activate the unit, you see it turn on with a green LED and it heats at a lower pressure, but the pressure is too low. I select only hot water but nothing, but cold. Too hot wouldn't be a problem because i could just add some cold to it, but i get no hot water at all and you can hear and see the unit turn on. If i run water a nearly a trickle it will get hot, but as soon as i put the pressure up at faucet it will get cold again fast.

    If anyone could help me out with suggestions, i would appreciate it.
    Thank You
  5. call an electrician out before you burn down your home

    http://plumberindianapolis.com/

    that appears to be an ELECTRIC TANKLESS heater .... correct??

    I dont think you mentioned it was an electric in your first post , did you ??

    those can be a living hell to get working correctly....

    I dont know exactly what you have done electrically to your system
    but most folks have had to upgrade their electircal boxes just to handle
    the current that one of those pigs sucks out of the line...

    somewhere on this site there is a cute story of a guy that lived on a dead end cul-de-sak street with 4 other neighbors and when his electric tankless came on
    all his neighbors lights went dim, because they were all tied into the same transformer for the street.. :cool::cool: That is totally priceless....
    ;)

    if you did not get an electrician in on this DIY deal, you might want to have someone check out what you are hooked up to at the pole and what your electrical box can handle, because you could easily burn down the home if it there is not enough juice comming into the house....;)
    this is just a suggestion..
    maybe you know what you are doing and maybe you dont......


    the second thing about a electric tankless is you MUST de lime them often
    and I dont see any hooks ups to do that on your lines.... They will clog up
    a lot faster than a gas tankless unit..


    start with the phase and amps that your box can handle and go from there.

  6. Chucky

    Chucky New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Montreal
    heater

    Yes, sorry about that, it is a fully electrical unit.
    The breaker panel puts out 200amps 2 phase and the unit requires 60 amps 2 phase. I have a 70 amp breaker on the line feeding the unit with 4 guage wires.
    I also checked, while the unit is running, what its pulling and in all, unit pulls 60 to 62 amps total and at the 3 elements it pulls 20 to 21 amps each.
    As for de liming the unit, if we can get it running properlly i can set it up better to flush system after. Good suggestion.
    Thank You
  7. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
    3,260
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    I don't know how the controls on this heater work. Are each of the 3 elements pulling full current when you have the hot water faucet open in the kitchen?
  8. Chucky

    Chucky New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Montreal
    yes, 20 to 21 amps each, so about 60 to 62 total at line in.
  9. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
    3,260
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    I am suspicious that the incoming water temperature is quite low, and that the heater cannot heat it quickly enough. The lavatory faucet does not flow as much as the kitchen faucet, so the heater cannot keep up with the demand. I have heard that electric tankless water heaters are very limited in their capability, but have no personal experience with them.
  10. Chucky

    Chucky New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Montreal

    It says on the website and i quote: This unit is 4.2 pgm,for temperature rise.
    Max temperature: 125 deg.F.With this unit you can run 3 SHOWERS PLUS.You will never run out of hot water.
    So it should be able to handle it, it can run a small lavatory faucet and a shower. But not the other shower.
  11. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
    3,260
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    Does it mention anything about incoming water temperature?
    It would probably work fine in the south where the incoming water is over 50-60 degrees all year around.

    It could be that there is something else wrong, but I learned a long time ago that if the professional plumbers don't use certain products, there is probably a good reason for it.
  12. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,262
    Location:
    New England
    That spec is meaningless unless you know what your incoming water temperature is AND how big of a temperature rise it is designed to provide at various flow rates. Most can go 70-degrees at full flow (big generalization), so if it started out at just above freezing (my local typical late winter temps), at full flow, that's 102-103 degrees max. Now, if it started out at a more normal southern US winter water temp of say 50-degrees, that's 120-degrees or so and late summer incoming water temps, not a problem in most of the US unless you have a deep well. Read the fine print on actual temperature rise at various flow rates. Your incoming water in the winter just may be the reason why it is underperforming (in your view!). Operation in the northern half of the US can be quite different than that in the southern half...a tankless often needs to either be larger, ganged together with more than one, or your expectations reduced for satisfactory results when living in a cold climate.
  13. Chucky

    Chucky New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Montreal
    But then i wouldn't get hot water anywhere, why would it work ok in one shower and not another? It seems to work even in colder climates, because it feeds one bathroom fine, nice and hot, but not the rest of the house.
  14. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,262
    Location:
    New England
    All modern shower valves have anti-scald technology. Often, this has two components: a pressure balance valve and some mechanical stop that prevents the control from getting too hot. If the tankless system can keep up with the demand, it may simply be that you need to adjust that internal stop to allow the handle to get more hot water there. If this shower uses more water (flow restrictor removed, or multiple showerheads), then it's strictly a volume thing, and it can't keep up with the demand.
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