Sulfur Eliminator

Discussion in 'Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog' started by valveman, Mar 27, 2013.

  1. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,351
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    Has anyone tried the "Sulfur Eliminator"?

    http://www.wellwaterstinks.com/

    A customer told me about this and said it works great. It oxidizes in the well so a regular bladder tank can be used instead of the old hydro tank.

    [video=youtube_share;9ZuEYmpa-jA]http://youtu.be/9ZuEYmpa-jA[/video]
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 27, 2013
  2. justwater

    justwater Well Drilling/Service

    Messages:
    324
    Location:
    FL/GA
    i ran into one of these a few years back, or something very similar anyway. if nothing else, it definitely made the inside of the well and drop pipe disgusting. they say it wont make your pump run, but what happens when a well owner runs water from a faucet? the one i seen, the pump cycled every few minutes. dont think it would be too good for your csv systems valveman, unless you like the idea of 1 very long expensive cycle.

    not saying its useless, but i wasnt impressed. well cant be sealed, right? would think it would need to breath to work, but i dont know. also, how about the snifter/micronizer setups you sometimes see just for light sulfur... you know when you tilt the old holding tank over and see what comes out of the bottom. looks like with this setup, all of that now accumulates inside the well.
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2013
  3. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,351
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    I talked to the owner of the company, very nice guy. He said the unit only uses 1 1/2 gallons per hour. Even with a small tank and a CSV that won't cause many extra cycles. He also said it works on the water in the top of the well. Makes sense to me that the water in the top of the well rarely gets turned over with a conventional system. When the pump draws water it comes directly from the water "vein", so the water in the top of the well never gets used and actually gives a good place for the stinky stuff in the water to live. The Sulfur Eliminator drops aerated water from the top and therefore stirs all the water in the well. I guess the stuff that gets percipitated out has to have some place to go, so I can see it might go to the bottom of the well. But if the pump isn't set right on the bottom, that might be a good place for that stuff to go. But you have a valid point JW and I would like to hear from some people who have had one of these long enough to have discovered if that is a problem or not.
  4. justwater

    justwater Well Drilling/Service

    Messages:
    324
    Location:
    FL/GA
    I no doubt seen a different setup bc it ran much more than 1.5gph. Didnt have the little air filter either. Im also curious to hear if anyone that has experience with it.

    seems like it would work best with high storage wells and low demands. might be wrong though.
  5. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,351
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    It is vented. The little fitting where the tube goes in the well has a vent on the side.
  6. Heart0610

    Heart0610 New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    New London, NC
    I installed the Sulfur Eliminator on my well over 2 years ago and it works great. I had a problem with iron in my well so I installed the deluxe model. It catches the iron before it goes back in my well. I referred my dad who just had the rotten egg smell and he installed the regular model. His still has a filter on it that he rinses off about once a year. He says that his water taste so much better since the smell has been gone. Same goes for my well also. Best product ever for the money. They don't charge you until the smell is gone so you can't really beat that.
  7. justwater

    justwater Well Drilling/Service

    Messages:
    324
    Location:
    FL/GA
    sounds amazing.

    wheres slusser when u need him.
  8. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    He's over in the misnamed water softener forum where this type post should have been moved to. That forum is a water quality improvement and equipment forum, it's not just for softeners. :)

    I have watched the video and read all the info on the site. Unless the water spigot valve is adjusted, or there is a 1.5 gpHr flow control, either way the pump has to cycle.

    To get water out of the well the pump (and that spigot) is getting water from the pump inlet, not the top of the water column.

    The aeration caused by the falling water isn't going to aerate much H2S because H2S comes out of solution naturally when the water pressure falls and/or comes into contact with air (oxygen). So there will be little to no H2S in the water at the top of the water column and more the farther down the column you go.

    In the south most wells larger than 2" are 4" and that equipment is taking water form the pump inlet and treating it at 1.5 gpHr over 24-48 hrs. IIRC a 4" well holds like 3/4 gallon per foot of water? A 6" is 1.47 gal/ft. So the pump has to cycle although they say it doesn't. Actually it's the same as a 1.5 gpHr leak back into the well. The usual pressure tank size and switch settings should cause the pump to cycle about every 4-6 hrs with no water use in the house.

    IMO the thing shouldn't work well or at all with a rock bore well where the recovery water usually comes in from below the pump inlet. A screened well has screening above the pump inlet, so when the house uses water it gets treated water IF there has been sufficient time for a treatment being done at 1.5 gpHr to treat all the water above the pump inlet. A rock bore well should always have dissolved H2S (and its odor) still in the water no matter how long the 1.5 gpHr has been done between water uses in the house that does not pull the static water level down. But then... any pump is only moving water from the static water level in the well due to atmospheric pressure... So maybe it does allow treated water until the static water level stabilizes but... most of the treatment is being done naturally because of the pressure drop and air on top the water column.

    I think it is sold by allowing use of it before the people pay for it so if it doesn't work, the person throws it away or returns it at their expense. And I doubt anyone is told how often that happens. I say that based on knowing what the materials to make the thing would cost me and what the purchase price is. The prices are quite high. But then they say they have a patten on something and they may not be making that part themselves. I would think they have a patten on the whole thing though.

    The product may work for some people in the south but I have my doubts it would work well across the non freezing areas of the US. Or if it would work well or for very long with iron or any type of bacteria in the water.

    It looks like the Deluxe model is using a GAC or carbon block filter cartridge. They don't remove soluble/dissolved iron, only rust, but then air oxidizes iron and that will be happening as their product adds air in the return line.. And there should be a bunch of rust buildup inside the casing at and above the water line and some falling down the water column to be sucked into the pump inlet when the pump runs.

    Bottom line.... I wouldn't sell it or buy it. Especially for $400-$600 and without a spigot at the well.
  9. VAWellDriller

    VAWellDriller New Member

    Messages:
    170
    Location:
    Richmond, VA
    I follow your logic----must correct you on two things.....screened wells are not screened above the pump inlet....the pump is always above the screen, most of the time significantly higher. I don't know about rock wells in other than ones I service in VA/NC, but they are always top feeders ....(pump set deeper than the water bearing fractures).
  10. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,351
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    The 1.5 gallon per hour cycling the pump once every 6-8 ours is not a problem. Even with a CSV and a small tank, cycling once every hour is not that bad. I can also see where this would work on the water above the pump, which probably doesn’t get exchanged with normal use.

    The only thing I see is if the pump never pulls the static level down, and all the water comes from below the pump, you would be pulling in untreated water. But if the static level does pull down when the pump starts, it would be getting treated water and all would be good. I also wonder what happens to the stuff that precipitates out in the well. Does it stick to the casing or fall to the bottom? I guess if the static level pulls down, the pump may suck in this stuff and some of it gets caught in the filter on the Sulfur Eliminator.

    Even though I don’t really understand everything about it, there are several people who say it is working great. I would really like to hear from more people who have one.
  11. justwater

    justwater Well Drilling/Service

    Messages:
    324
    Location:
    FL/GA
    i think i agree with slusser on about all of it except what vawelldriller pointed out. although i will say that rock wells down here absolutely enter from the bottom, pump always inside the casing above the rock here.
  12. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    Sorry I didn't see this until now. I'm not a driller and have not seen a screened well being drilled but I have seen diagrams of screening above a pump, mainly in low producing wells with multiple sections of screening. Possibly due to the pump not being set at the correct depth.

    Rock bore wells feed from anywhere below the casing, above and below the pump but, not from the actual bottom/end of the hole as many lay people seem to believe because they think the hole taps a pool/stream of water.

    I have seen many recorded camera inspections showing that. That was due to me at one time getting real serious about doing camera inspections and well cleaning. In PA where I'm from (historically #1 in the number of rural population on private residential wells until the 2000 census when TX went to #1) pumps are set anywhere from 5' to 20' off the bottom of the hole up, depending on the recovery rate, depth, draw down and such. Many are up to 500' deep with the average of 150' to 300'. Most wells in PA are 6" and rock bore with more than enough recovery rate. That allows many pumps to be set based on price rather than to buy a larger pump to be set deeper.

    Sediment of any kind (rust, oxidized H2S, turbidity) that isn't sucked into the pump always falls to the bottom of the well. Rust caused by oxidized iron clings to the casing from the static water level down to the bottom of the draw down area. Some of that that rust can fall off the casing and drop pipe and cable when it dries out due to the static water level decreasing seasonally or drought etc.. Sometimes pumps are raised to get them up out of that sediment rather than purging the well because pump hoist or other equipment can't get to the well without serious damage due to the size or layout of the property etc.. In all my years of pump work I only knew of one pump hoist truck and 99% of wells had 169 psi or 200 psi polypipe, I never saw any PVC and only 2 wells on galvanized pipe. Pump guys use portable pump pulling machines like the Pull-A-Pump etc..
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hB_jzeU1Xgw
  13. craigpump

    craigpump Member

    Messages:
    840
    Location:
    ct
    Back in 1965 my father bought a new Monitor pump hoist, after that every single submersible went in on galvanized pipe. Why? So the plumbers couldn't pull them when they needed to be replaced.

    Up z dazys and sch 80 put everyone in the pump business
  14. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    When it comes to water quality I say galvanized pipe and fittings should be illegal.
  15. craigpump

    craigpump Member

    Messages:
    840
    Location:
    ct
    Plumbers shouldn't touch pumps either.....

    We don't use galvanized now except on deep sets.
  16. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    Well at least those that don't know what they are doing or don't have the tools to work on them. I've never been a plumber, nor a driller. But I did a lot of plumbing to install my water treatment equipment and replace pressure tanks and pumps though.

    Many plumbers and drillers shouldn't touch water treatment equipment either.
  17. Heart0610

    Heart0610 New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    New London, NC
    Who wouldn't pay 400 to 600 dollars to get rid of the rotten egg smell? When other systems cost thousands of dollars and still do not fix the problem! Slusser if you have never actually used the product then how can you give your so called professional opinion? I have the Sulfur Eliminator installed on my well and it recycles 36 gallons of water a day within a 24 hour period. I have a standard size 20 gallon tank and I get appox 6 gallons of draw out of my tank. There is no more electricity used or pump wear and tear than me taking an extra shower a day. My old water conditioning system back washed more water than that every night. and if I had bacteria like e-coli the Sulfur Eliminator is not used for that anyway. I had a well guy run a camera down in my well. I have steel casing and my father has pvc casing. My casing look like it had a quarter inch think of iron and his pvc casing had a good iron residue. After having the product installed for over 2 years my iron problem has stopped. As it was explained to me from the owner of the company who is a certified well contractor and very knowledgable that my irons are getting trapped in the filter. this filter was special made for the product and I only have to replace it once a year. They even sent me an extra filter when I ordered the product. After having the product on my well he was 100% correct. I have recommended this product to many of friends which one of them lives in Fl. It took care of his problem also. So your theory about the deep south goes out the window! There are many "too good to be true" products on the the market but The Sulfur Eliminator is not one of them! This product 100% does what it says! It was the best $598.00 I ever spent. I wish I would have known about The Sulfur Eliminator before I spent $5300 on that other system!
  18. bear1973

    bear1973 New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Has anyone else tried the Sulfur Eliminator? I live in North Carolina and have the dreaded rotten-egg water smell. I've been managing it with bleach - a couple of cups every month. I've also set the heater to over 150 degrees a few times and shocked the hot water heater directly. But it keeps coming back and is getting worse. It's now in the cold water.

    I'm planning on giving the Sulfur Eliminator a try - seems like there's not much to lose. But the last thing I need is for it to over-tax my new pump. I'll definitely review it here, but would like to hear from more folks who've actually used one before installing one myself. (Sorry, Heart0610 - your post sounds a little bit like an advertisement, even if you are just a satisfied customer.)

    Thanks!
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