Square sewage ejector basin?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by dhoerl, Jan 8, 2011.

  1. dhoerl

    dhoerl New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    NJ
    A 22" diameter circular basin is too big for my application. I would love to find a 18" x 30" square basin. If anyone knows of such a beast I'd love to know. Its for a basement bathroom (shower, toilet, sink).

    As a component in a complete system works too!

    Thanks!

    David
  2. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,253
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Manufacturing a "rectangular basin" would not be economically feasible, since there would almost ZERO demand for it. In fact they might only sell ONE, and that would be to you. If they were going to make a basin with square corners, it would be a perfect square anyway. IF the overall dimension of the top is 18" that would make the basin's interior dimension about 14" and that would be a ridiculously small size.
  3. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
    3,236
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    You would need to check with your area's plumbing code and/or inspector, but I have seen a number of custom made sewage basins.

    You will need to calculate the minimum capacity necessary for your installation. Depending on the height of the inlet an 18x30 could be too small to allow for ample pump run time, which would lead to future problems.

    Code where I am (WI) specifies a minimum 24" inside basin diameter for a single pump system and 30" minimum for a duplex pump system.
    Perhaps you could explain how/why a common basin size won't work and you might find a better solution.
  4. dhoerl

    dhoerl New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    NJ
    Sorry to ask a stupid question - here is the why

    I am putting a bathroom in the basement - writing up permit now. Basement has a concrete slab. I have two choices - either fit the ejector pump into the bathroom somehow, or knock out a 20 foot run through the concrete to the nearest unfinished part of the basement. Obviously option A is preferable.

    My thoughts were this - that I could put the basin in a 18" x 30" space, run all the wiring and pipes up to an adjacent wall, and plop common bathroom sink/cabinet over it. This would be easily dismantable if access to basin is required. If building inspect won't allow that, well, I'd put a box over the pump, and then a pedestal sink (minus the pedestal) over the pump.

    The beauty of this is that the toilet is 30" to the left of the sink, and the shower 30" to the right of the sink (that is, that's where the drains would be. Short runs, minimal disturbance to the slab. If I put a standard 24" circular basin in, then it will protrude 6" or past the sink/cabinet.

    Thinking about it, well, I could build a rectangular closet like area next to the shower on the right, where the bottom is removeable, and thus you could access the pump by removing the cabinet/sink or pedestal, and also the bottom of the "closet". I just loose a foot or so of usable counter space, and the bathroom won't look as nice.

    David

    PS: I did find the Liberty Pumps Pro 370. This system is 21" wide at the top. I'm almost there!
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2011
  5. dlarrivee

    dlarrivee New Member

    Messages:
    1,172
    Location:
    Canada
    The beauty of putting your vanity overtop of you ejector basin is lost on me...

    Half ass reno always looks half ass.
  6. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
    3,236
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    I would look really hard at how you could lay out the rooms a little differently. The basin needs to be easily accessible for service. The vent and discharge lines rise vertically out of the top of the basin. A 3x4 closet should be considered the minimum adequate space for a basin.
    Don't forget that you will also need a dedicated electrical circuit for the pump and a 2nd circuit for a high level alarm.
  7. dhoerl

    dhoerl New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    NJ
    Purpose of putting vanity over the pump - this is an option and not a requirement.

    Guess this seems pretty obvious to me - sorry its not obvious to others. In my situation I just don't have 6 sq feet of space to dedicate to this - without removing the shower. I don't need the interior of the vanity for much - if I'm (and I say "me" in the royal sense since a licensed plumber is doing the work) careful on locating all piping, once the pump is installed and plumbed, a vanity with the bottom cutout and one side notched could drop on top of it, acting as a dual cover, sound insulator - while permitting a sink to occupy the same vertical space. If the whole thing is designed to come apart easily - well then there's the access to the pump.

    I had such a vanity before you would disconnect the two water inlets and the drain, the whole top lifted off, then the cabinet lifted off.

    Again, if that doesn't fly for some reason then I (royal "I") would construct a small box to cover the pump, and I then place a wall mounted sink over it. That is, box the pump and the sink drain.

    Note that on page 4 of the Liberty Pumps Pro-370 shows the outlet rising about 6" then going horizontal: http://www.libertypumps.com/Data/InstallationManual/7225000D_ForWeb.pdf

    If the basin goes where I believe it could go, then the horizontal run is only 18". It may be possible to use 45 degree connections and not 90s with a cabinet acting as the enclosure. OBVIOUSLY this would be discussed with the licensed plumber doing the work.

    I DO understand that if the cabinet/sink option flies, that the interior of the cabinet is going to be gutted and not provide any other useful function than holding the sink up.

    David

    PS: in a past life I had a house built. We had a basement bathroom. We had the ability to lay the drain pipe before the pour - so it ran about 20 feet to an unfinished part of the basement. No problem. Jack hammering a 25 foot run in an older house just doesn't seem like a good idea, but then, I am looking for a good solution so do not discount this out of hand.
  8. ballvalve

    ballvalve General Engineering Contractor

    Messages:
    3,261
    Location:
    northfork, california
    Lay the pipe on the surface in the corner and step up 7" to the bathroom. Pipe can go anywhere now. Warmer floor too.
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