Solenoid Failure?

Discussion in 'Electrical Forum discussion & Blog' started by Kiko, Nov 16, 2011.

  1. ballvalve

    ballvalve General Engineering Contractor

    Messages:
    3,261
    Location:
    northfork, california
    Solenoids get buggered up with dirt and dust and then require more voltage to overcome it. Especially if buried in some part near the logs. Silicone spray helps solenoids last a long time, some are mixed with anti-corrosive elements.
  2. Kiko

    Kiko New Member

    Messages:
    175
    Location:
    Royal Oak, Michigan
    My only concern is that the vapors from the lubricant might ignite.
  3. BobL43

    BobL43 DIY Senior Member

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    I'm a pretty handy guy; I've replaced propane heater gas valves on millivolt systems and 24 VAC systems, I've made and calibrated my own water collumn pressure gauges, BUT I would NEVER tinker with the gas valve itself and try to repair it, ESPECIALLY one that is in the house. Yes, I would disect the valve, see what makes it tick, etc. but never, ever trust my ablilities or lack thereof to fix it. Your Mileage may vary, but I don't want to be responsible for blowing up my house.
  4. BobL43

    BobL43 DIY Senior Member

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    1,786
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    see my post # 23. Wait for a new valve assembly.
  5. Kiko

    Kiko New Member

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    175
    Location:
    Royal Oak, Michigan
    The solenoid screws into the gas valve and is a replaceable part. I have to remove the old one to replace it anyway, so I will have a good look at it to see if it is gunked up.
  6. BobL43

    BobL43 DIY Senior Member

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    Oh, OK
  7. DonL

    DonL Out of the Trades

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    One of the problems with solenoids that operate on DC is that the Frame can become Magnetized.

    You may want to use a VHS bulk tape eraser or the such, and try to demagnetize the Valve.

    Sounds Crazy but I have seen that on cheep valves and relays that don't use stainless or isolated frames.
  8. BobL43

    BobL43 DIY Senior Member

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    I have an armature growler that would do the job!:D
  9. DonL

    DonL Out of the Trades

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    If you want to lower the voltage of the coil, You can remove a few turns from it.

    The voltage goes down, But the current goes up...

    Playing with Gas Valves can be a very Moonlighting experience.
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2011
  10. BobL43

    BobL43 DIY Senior Member

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    As Ralph Cramden used to say "one of these days, Bam, off to the moon"?
  11. Kiko

    Kiko New Member

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    175
    Location:
    Royal Oak, Michigan
    Wouldn't removing a few turns from the coil reduce the strength of the electromagnet, thus making it even more difficult to open that sticky latch?
  12. BobL43

    BobL43 DIY Senior Member

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    How would you possibly unwind the coil? Isn't it impregnated with epoxy or varnish?
  13. DonL

    DonL Out of the Trades

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    Location:
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    I would not recommend messing with the gas valve.

    But the mag field is still high because the current goes up, More Power. In theory.

    The amount of turns and gauge of wire is what sets the operating voltage range.

    That Gas coil may have a limit resistor in series with it. And probable is encapsulated.
  14. Kiko

    Kiko New Member

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    175
    Location:
    Royal Oak, Michigan
    I wouldn't unwind it even if it were possible... just curious about the theory behind it.
  15. Kiko

    Kiko New Member

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    175
    Location:
    Royal Oak, Michigan
    Oh, so that's why a 9 volt works better than 4 AA's, because the greater voltage creates more amperage, and thus more power?

    BTW, I keep repeating that the solenoid is replaceable and simply screws into the gas valve.
    Supposedly, at long last, they are mailing me out a replacement. Hopefully, I'll get it by Christmas. :)
  16. RYounk007

    RYounk007 New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    Richfield, OH
    Reviving an old thread here....

    I am having the exact same problem with what sounds like the exact same unit. Jumping the wires with the 9V, I can switch the main burner on and off. However, I believe my remote receiver unit may be completely fried, as it is no longer making any beeping, even when using the "learn" button. It is also not able to turn the burner off (not sure from your description if yours was able to or not). Did you see the same result (no beeping) from your unit while the solenoid was busted?

    Also, any tips dealing with ProCom on getting the parts replaced under warranty? Was the solenoid the fix and as easy as it sounds? This unit was already installed in the house that I bought, so I don't have a receipt.

    Thanks!
  17. BobL43

    BobL43 DIY Senior Member

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    Just refer to my post #23;I'm not trying to be a smart ass
    (I already am one I guess, lol)
  18. DonL

    DonL Out of the Trades

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    Post #23 reads;


    If the coil is good then the valve may be sticking and should be replaced.


    Have fun, and be safe doing it.
  19. Kiko

    Kiko New Member

    Messages:
    175
    Location:
    Royal Oak, Michigan

    There was always beeping coming from the old receiver, and it always was able to turn off the gas valve, since that required less voltage.

    ProCom sent me a new remote receiver and solenoid. I replaced the receiver first and it worked just fine, so I just kept the solenoid as a spare.

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