Soldering copper to brass??

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by David Einhorn, Jan 19, 2013.

  1. David Einhorn

    David Einhorn New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    Texas
    I just discovered a leak coming from my shower body and see that the water supply pipe (copper) was soldered to the brass fitting on the shower body. The brass fitting is threaded. Is this code? Why would any professional plumber do this? Do I have recourse with the original plumber that performed the work? photo.jpg
  2. nukeman

    nukeman Nuclear Engineer

    Messages:
    709
    Location:
    VA
    That connection is normal. Many shower valves give the option to either thread on a female fitting or you can put the copper pipe in the socket and solder. Personally, I like the solder connection and that I what I used on my shower.

    How long ago was this done? It may be that the solder didn't get fully into the joint (joint not clean enough, not the right amount of flux, not enough solder, etc.). It should have been inspected for leaks at the time of install, but if the leak is very small, the leak may not have been detected.

    If it was recent work, you could call the plumber back. If it has been that way for some time, you may need to get another plumber to fix it. If it is really old, it may be a good time to replace the valve and trim.
  3. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    14,889
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    Plumbers prefer soldering the pipe to the valve body. That's four fewer joints to leak.

    It just needs to be dissasembled and resoldered.
    Remove the cartridge while doing this.

    And yes, it may be a good time for replacement if this is old. Though the valve does look to be pretty recent.
  4. David Einhorn

    David Einhorn New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    Texas
    The work is less than 4 years old, so I think I can avoid a full replacement job. I'm wondering if the plumber will be willing to fix their work from that long ago. What's the industry norm on warrantees for workmanship?

    Thanks for the replies!!
  5. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    tail lights!
  6. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
    3,244
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    I don't know any trade that is going to eat labor after the first year has passed.
  7. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,486
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    quote; Why would any professional plumber do this? Do I have recourse with the original plumber that performed the work?

    Professional plumbers PERFER to do it that way. Here, the warranty would be two years, by state law. It is unlikely ANYONE would do the repair as a "warranty item".
  8. BobL43

    BobL43 DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,786
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Looks like applying heat to that joint was scorching the very- close wood above it and possibly a little caution was used which may have caused a less than perfect joint?
  9. Winslow

    Winslow Plumber

    Messages:
    450
    Location:
    Hawaii
    generally it's one year
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