Sink overflowing Alzhiemer's - need metering push faucet?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by Mary B, Nov 14, 2006.

  1. Mary B

    Mary B New Member

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    4
    I am looking for a metering faucet to use for a person with Alzheimer's who leaves the faucets on in the kitchen. I would prefer a two handled faucet - more familiar - but I can't find one with a hot water temperature limit and his water if very hot.

    Any 2 handled faucets out there with a hot water limit? Any thing I should know in general before purchasing a metered faucet?
    Thanks, Caregiver
  2. You can turn the temperature down on the hot water at the water heater. Is it electric or gas?
  3. Mary B

    Mary B New Member

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    Hi - It's in an apartment, so i can't turn the water down.
  4. OldPete

    OldPete DIY Senior Member

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    Location:
    NJ
    Mary,

    I'm not sure about for your application, but with Shower/Tub valves they have an anti-scald setting so you can only allow so much of the hot water to come out. The only problem I can see is that the ones I've seen are the single handle kind. I would try to contact the Alzhiemer's Association and see if they have any connections with anyone at any of the larger supply houses.

    Just a thought, good luck.

    Pete
  5. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

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    faucet

    There is no way a two handle faucet could be made temperature limiting because there is no way to turn on the cold at the same time to temper the hot flow. Get a Speakman single handle metering faucet. It has a lever that swings left and right for temperature and then a push on the handle
    turns it on.
  6. SteveW

    SteveW DIY Senior Member

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    1,052
    Location:
    Omaha, NE
    In addition to having some temperture control to prevent scalding, sounds like you are also looking for a faucet which shuts itself off if the user forgets to do so - right? Like some commercial faucets in public restrooms, like interstate rest areas?
  7. Verdeboy

    Verdeboy In the Trades

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    2,051
    You can turn the hot water shutoff valve (located under the sink) off or mostly off. That would limit your hot water, especially for a single-handle model.
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2006
  8. Verdeboy

    Verdeboy In the Trades

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    You have to be careful, though, because some shutoff valves will leak when they are only open part way. You can usually fix this by tightening the packing nut.
  9. plumber1

    plumber1 Plumber

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    How will closing down on the hot prevent scalding?
  10. OldPete

    OldPete DIY Senior Member

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    Location:
    NJ
    I was wondering the same thing, won't it come out just as hot only slower when turned all the way to the hot position?
  11. Mary B

    Mary B New Member

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    4
    Hi - I posted the orginal message. Thank you all for your responses. A small "mixing valve" under the sink was also suggested by a plumber - stating it would lower the hot water temperature at the kitchen tap. Is that a good idea?

    Yes, I am looking to have some temperture control to prevent scalding, and a timed shut off feature if the user forgets to do so - like in some commercial faucets in public restrooms.

    Again, I would prefer a 2 handle faucet if the mixing valve underneath would work. When dealing with Alzheimer's and they are used to a 2 handle faucet, they may get awfully confused with only one handle.
  12. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    If this needs both cold (only) water, say for a drink or brushing teeth, and warm to wash hands, etc. then the only reasonable way I can think of is to use a mixing (tempering) valve to limit the hot input. If you only need warm water, then you could get an infrared operated automatic faucet. They put their hands near it, and it turns on, go away, and it turns off. The push to turn on valves are a pain.

    I've seen limit adjustments on shower valves, but not sink faucets (maybe some of the commercial ones?).
  13. diluting a thimble of scalding hot water is easy to picture

    lowering the flow is a good idea, as you only risk getting a thimbleful of scalding water on you instead of a cupful. Plus, when you have to add cold water fast, to cool your hand down, you are only working against a small amount of hot water in the flow instead of a large amount. Sounds like a winner.

    An electronic eye device can stop flow. I don't know if there are devices designed only to stop flow once started. That would be the ticket here. My off-hand guess is 15 to 45 seconds till it cuts flow; that's a long time, for me, but it is important that it not become an irritant to be user.

    david

  14. That's the only answer that seems most logical. Same kind you find in commercial establishments these days to control water usage and remove the moving parts issue.

    Walk up to the faucet and it turns on to a predetermined flow/temperature and it shuts off after walking away from it.

    Been around families that have loved ones with this disease and you almost have to design the living quarters like you have a small child that gets into everything. That including removing the handles from the stove.

    That above described faucet is expensive and only covers one fixture. Take into consideration the kitchen faucet, the shower and now you are talking big money for the changes.

    Is the living situation sort of like limited home health care or something?
  15. A flow stopper only

    i am suggesting only a device that turns flows off once started.

    Although we could always say, nope never heard of it, I'm sure it is useful enough to enough people, that it'll soon be available somewhere. Sooner or later. May have to go hunting in Asia to get a first one made.

    The advantage of only stopping a long flow is that it changes nothing in the way people operate their fixtures today. Everything looks the same and works the same.

    Personally I hate the electronic eyes that turn flow ON, since they are slow and I never know where to place my hands. I wave and wave, slowing down here and there, and feel like a fool. I could get used to one, if I had one to get used to, on a permanent basis.

    david
  16. Verdeboy

    Verdeboy In the Trades

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    2,051
    They have those electronic eye faucets at Walmart, and they suck.

    If you don't position your hands just right, they don't turn on, or they turn off way too soon. You have to keep dancing your hands under them for 5 minutes to try to get all the soap off. That's if you can find one that even works. Half of them only have a trickle of water coming out of them. Some are scalding hot. Some are freezing cold.

    I think a mixing valve would be best. Then tee this luke warm water into both the hot and the cold sides of a two-handle faucet.

    Maybe you can still get the old style faucets that you used to see in rest stops, where you manually push down on them and they pop up after a minute, shutting off the water.
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2006

  17. 90% of the problems associated with those fixtures is lack of proper maintenance which equates to slowly fading battery strength, proper adjustment of the eye that gauges what is in front of it and the most common,

    not keeping the viewing window of that device clean. I agree, they are a pain in the ass but we come from a society where plumbing is "put it in and forget about it" mentality.

    Businesses that have those faucets won't keep up the much needed maintenance those faucets need either.

    I will admit they are a PITA when it comes to sloan flushometers.
  18. Mary B

    Mary B New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Warm Warm from the Cold Tap Using a Mixing Valve?

    Hmm? A mixing valve with a self closing metered faucet would give the user warm water when they pressed BOTH the hot and cold water tap? I was under the impression that you could still get cold water when you pressed the cold handle and warm (not HOT) when you press the hot handle. No?
    The last posting stated that you get luke warm water in both the hot and cold faucet when using a point of service mixing valve under the sink.
  19. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,824
    Location:
    New England
    If it is a two handle, one spout, you could put a mixing valve on the hot side - this would limit how hot it got, and still allow you to only turn on the cold water.

    If it is two separate valves, you still might want to put a mixing (tempering) valve on the hot so it would limit the temp. I would find this inconvenient since you couldn't adjust the temp to just what you want unless you plugged the sink and did it in the bowl.
  20. Cass

    Cass Plumber

    Messages:
    5,980
    Location:
    Ohio
    I believe Glacier bay makes a 2 / 3 handle faucet the 2 outer handles are to mix the water and once you have got the temp you like the 3rd handle turns all the water (hot and cold) on or off. You could preset the temp and remove those handles and leave just the 1 on off handle.
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