Shower valves

Discussion in 'Shower & bathtub Forum & Blog' started by RMJ, Feb 1, 2010.

  1. RMJ

    RMJ New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Omaha NE
    Hello

    I have a couple of questions regarding installation of shower valves. I am installing Delta main valve and a diverter after that (see pics). If I read the instructions right the plaster ring on the main valve should be flush with the finished wall and the finished wall should fall somewhere between the flat surface on the diverter.

    After looking at the diagram on the diverter instructions it looked like a straight shot between the two valves, however it looks like the main valve will need to come out a little which would put the diverter too far out.

    I put up temporary 1/2" drywall to guage.

    My questions are

    -How much extra thickness do you figure to add for thinset, Kerdi, thinset and then tile (regular ceramic or porcelin).

    -Do you typically have to offset these valves or should they just line up. The plaster ring for the diverter is just rubber and doesn't seem to stay in place too well so its hard to guage

    Thanks for your help

    Bob

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Feb 14, 2010
  2. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,240
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    I HATE companies that make valves that are normally used together, but have different measurements so you have to offset them. It would be so easy to just design them so a staight piece of pipe would connect them both and set both of them at the correct position. Delta is not the only one who does it, however.
  3. RMJ

    RMJ New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Omaha NE
    Hello hj

    Thanks for the response. So I am understanding it correctly that I do have to offset? The rubber ring doesn't fit real good so I wanted to make sure I wasn't missing something.

    Any ideas what I should figure for tile and thinset for finished wall. I was thinking 3/8" on top of 1/2" sheetrock?

    Thanks
  4. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,802
    Location:
    New England
    There is likely a min/max mark on the ring. I highly recommend you temporarily install the trim and see what the projection of the handle is relative to the wall and the rest of the trim before you do the install. You may not like it at one extreme or the other. The only guarantee you have if you get it between the min/max lines is that the trim will fit, not that you'll like the way it looks. If you get it too close to one extreme and the wall ends up being a little thicker or thinner, you may not get the trim to fit at all - either it won't tighten up against the wall (too far out) or you can't catch the screws to mount it and the handle scrapes the trim (too far in).
  5. RMJ

    RMJ New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Omaha NE
    I talked to Delta about this but not comfortable that the person really knew the answer. She said that yes I should be able to connect with a straight pipe between the 2 valves.

    What doesn't make sense is that on the main valve only instructions it says plastergaurd should be flush with the finished wall but that seems to put the diverter too far out. At best it is at the minimum position on the diverter.

    So in the real world is it common to offset the valves of the same manufacturer?
  6. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,240
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Quite often that is the case, but it is up to you to use the markings on the valves to determine how it will fit.
  7. Plumbermurrieta

    Plumbermurrieta Plumber

    Messages:
    18
    Location:
    Murrieta Southern California
    Pipes required include the hot and cold supply lines and a pipe leading to a shower head. A mixing valve and shower head are also needed. Air chambers may be required.

    Bath/shower fixtures also rate low in fixture units and are often positioned on branch drains and wet or back vented as are the sinks. Both shower stalls and tubs enter the stack at floor level or below because of the position of the floor drain trap. The faucet and shower head assembly require an open wall for installation. Remember bathtubs and shower stalls may require support framing. A bathtub filled with water is extremely heavy, so check building codes and framing support before installing the tub. The minimum floor area required for a shower stall is 1,024 square inches, and you should allow 24 inches from the stall itself to any other fixture or wall.

    1. Install all piping before installing the tub itself.
    2. Lower the tub into place so that the continuous flange fits against the wall studs and rests on 1 x 4 or 2 x 4 supports. Anchor the tub to the enclosure with nails or screws inserted through the flanges into the studs.
    3. Assemble the drain connections by connecting the tub overflow with the tub drain ABOVE the trap, not beyond it. The trap will have a compression fitting that screws over the arm of the overflow assembly.
    4. Hot and cold water lines are run to the tub/shower mixing valve where they are attached, usually by, sweating these directly into the hot and cold ports of the mixing valve.
    5. Run a pipe up the wall for the shower head. On the top of this pipe, sweat on a brass female threaded winged fitting that is nailed or screwed into a framing support.
    6. Extend a piece of 1/2" pipe, according to the manufacturer's instructions, for the tub spout. Sweat on a male threaded fitting at the end of the pipe or use a brass nipple of the proper length and a 1/2" cap.
    7. At this time you will need to have your rough plumbing inspected.
    8. Restore water pressure and check the drain connection and the supply pipes for any leaks.
    9. Replace the wall with moisture resistant drywall as a base for your wall covering. Seal joints between the wall and your new tub with silicone caulk as protection against water seepage.
    10. Install the Spout, handles and shower head. The shower head screws onto the shower arm stub out. Whether installing a new shower head or replacing an old one, always clean the pipe threads and apply new pipe joint compound, PTFE tape or both to prevent leaks.
  8. Redwood

    Redwood Master Plumber

    Messages:
    7,453
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Huh? Wow that was a mouthful!
  9. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,240
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Sure was, and not a single comment referencing the original question about offsetting the connection between the valve and diverter. Since this is a shower installation, they don't even have to know how to install a bathtub.
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