Shower Diverter on Valve Trim or Spout?

Discussion in 'Shower & bathtub Forum & Blog' started by pmetiv, Oct 17, 2008.

  1. pmetiv

    pmetiv New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    New York, NY
    This is my first post on this forum but have been reading it for a few years. Lots of good advices on here! Thanks!

    I want to install a valve trim (Grohe: 19 494 000) which as the diverter at the valve trim instead of at the spout. Is this a bad choice?

    We have very good water pressure in the appartment we live in. I saw a few post about strong water pressure being an issues some time with those.

    It also looks like 90% of the diverters are at the spout. Is it only because it's cheaper to make?

    Thanks for any advice/ experience you might have?

    Pierre
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2008
  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,937
    Location:
    New England
    I think a divertor on the tub spout will end up being cheaper. Maybe not in the long term, though. You generally can't repair a tub spout, and when the divertor goes, you replace the spout. Most of these aren't that great a quality, so the cost isn't too much, but it's generally a throw-away part, may cost more in the long term.

    A valve can be repaired.

    WIth most tub spouts, when the supply is turned off, it falls back to tub spout (but not always!) and drains the riser pipe. A valve remains where you leave it regardless. This can be disconcerting if you are standing in the tub and planning to adjust the temp at the spout and it spits cold water at you from the spray. With a divertor, if you want to drain teh water out of the riser, you have to leave the valve mid-way after you shut the supply off, or you'll have that column of cold water there further giving you a start when you turn it back on.

    So, part of it is what you are used to...either works.
  3. pmetiv

    pmetiv New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    New York, NY
    Thanks for your reply Jim.

    I read on the forum that if the water pressure is very strong (my case), water could go up to the showerhead even if it's directed at the spout.

    I wouldn't want that!

    Anybody seen that before?
  4. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,937
    Location:
    New England
    It can happen, but doesn't normally if you use the specified pipe and distances and follow the instructions on installation. You wouldn't have this issue with the divertor valve, but can happen with the divertor on the tub spout. If your pressure is high enough to cause that to happen when it is properly installed, you need a PRV to reduce the pressure.
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