Shared exhaust vents

Discussion in 'HVAC Heating & Cooling' started by Kiton, Apr 13, 2014.

  1. Kiton

    Kiton Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2014
    Location:
    Quebec
    I would like to install a whole home air exchanger this spring.
    What can or can not share the exhaust vent with these units?

    The kitchen currently does not have a vented stove hood. Can I tie a stove hood vent in to the air exchanger exhaust line (5 inch insulated flexible) as it heads up to the roof to allow only one penetration?

    The unit I am considering is this:

    http://www.venmar.ca/92-air-exchangers-evo5-700-hrv-hepa-hardware-stores-only.html
     
  2. Kiton

    Kiton Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2014
    Location:
    Quebec
    The maker of the air exchanger replied today, just an FYI, they say the stove hood should never be tied in to the exhaust of a home air exchanger.
     
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  4. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

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    Test, Don't Guess!
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    Land of Cheese
    There is always a potential for backflow, so the vents should be kept separate.
     
  5. DonL

    DonL Jack of all trades Master of one

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2011
    Occupation:
    Rocket Scientist
    Location:
    Houston, TX

    I can understand why they do not recommend that.

    Venting Smoke and grease is not a good thing, and needs to be done properly. I would not use Flex for that vent.


    This is for a HEPA filter system ?


    Fix all leaks is a good place to start.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2014
  6. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2004
    Occupation:
    Retired Systems engineer for defense industry.
    Location:
    New England
    Venting a stovetop is best made with the shortest run possible, with the straightest route possible, and never with a corrugated pipe...only smooth-ductwork with well-sealed joints. Grease WILL condense, and potentially flow and stick into those corrugations, leading to a smelly, nasty fire hazard. Clean the filters on a regular basis, too. And in the worst case, on a well-used system, you may need to clean the ductwork as well.
     
  7. Kiton

    Kiton Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2014
    Location:
    Quebec
    Thank you guys,
    The smooth duct work makes really good sense, I had not worked it through that far yet. We BBQ'ed all winter long using the stove for meat no more than a dozen times. Maybe a charcoal filtered hood will do the trick and allow me to focus on other items that need updating in this house, god knows the list is long.


    DonL,
    I did not pick the unit for the HEPA features as much as the volume and energy efficiency. I think fixing the leaks will be an on going life time project based on my first winter here. :-( The bathroom is currently not vented and the entire basement is a home office/tool room and needs some fresh air.
    The non HEPA versions are not Energy Star and the savings with the cheaper non HEPA are offset in 2 years over the energy costs.
     
  8. DonL

    DonL Jack of all trades Master of one

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2011
    Occupation:
    Rocket Scientist
    Location:
    Houston, TX

    Make sure that you include the price of the HEPA filters. I think that one has 2, That will need replaced on occasion. Or you could just leave the filters out, If you do not need them, But that could offset the air flow some.

    Also, Energy Star is not all that its cracked up to be. Your usage may vary.


    Good Luck.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2014
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