Securing Pex and Valves to Joists?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by MonkeyWrenchHead, Jan 17, 2013.

  1. MonkeyWrenchHead

    MonkeyWrenchHead New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    New York
    Is it common to install shut off valves in a residential plumbing setup between pex tubing without a support of some sort, or is it a better practice to try to install the valves onto a joist?

    I'm planning to use the standard pex clamp supports for the tubing, but am trying to decide how I lay it out, and if the valves should land on a joist (Either on the bottom or side) to support the valve, or if that isn't necessary.
  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,134
    Location:
    New England
    The better solution is to use the engineered copper stubout brackets attached between studs and make the connection to your shutoffs onto the now anchored copper. stubout The stubout gets soldered to the bracket, the bracket screwed to the studs, and the pex connected to the stubout. If it's something like a shower valve, and you can anchor the valve itself (some have screw holes for this, some don't), then you could run the pex right up to the valve. Otherwise, the valve will just flop around.
  3. MonkeyWrenchHead

    MonkeyWrenchHead New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    New York
    Thanks Jim,
    Great tips in those situations. I should have been more clear on my scenario. I am re-plumbing the home from the basement so it is all the main trunk lines that run horizontal. I want to install a few shut off valves so I can isolate certain areas of the home if ever needed as they transition to the branch lines.

    I see that most installs are done where the pex tubing is attached to the bottom or side of a joist with a small clip that supports the tube. So my question is around valves that will be on the main trunk lines that lead to the branches. Here is an example of a picture I found on the web, see how the valve is just dangling in the wind on this horizontal run.

    1.jpg
    *Not my photo, one I found on the web

    Is this how most people install them? Or is it recommended to secure the valve itself to the joist?
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