Securing escutcheons

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by maddfrog, Jul 19, 2006.

  1. maddfrog

    maddfrog New Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2006
    Location:
    California
    I recently had a plumber install a pedestal sink (along with a Kohler Memoirs toilet, which had its own issues)

    The escutcheons on the supply lines don't fit snugly to the wall or the pipe. If I push them against the wall, they just slide back over time (we live near a train, so there's a lot of vibration). How can I secure them to the wall? I was thinking about a ring of plumber's putty on the wall behind them. Any other ideas?
     
  2. Dunbar Plumbing

    Dunbar Plumbing Master Plumber

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Occupation:
    Service Plumber, Outdoor Temperature Relief Owner
    Location:
    Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati Area
    Plumber's putty will work. I always use those plastic chrome scussions with a cut on one side. That way I can install them and remove them whether the valve is off or on the pipe.

    They don't corrode up like the metal ones either.
     
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  4. prashster

    prashster New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2005
    Or you can caulk.
     
  5. maddfrog

    maddfrog New Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2006
    Location:
    California
    Thanks for the replies

    I thought someone might know of an "old plumber's trick" other than putty or caulk.

    I'd rather use the putty because it will be completely covered by the escutcheon whereas the caulk will show. It'll also allow me to move the escutcheon for painting, etc.

    I was thinking I'd make a thick rope of it and press it on the wall around the pipe, leaving an opening at the bottom in case any moisture got in there. The escutcheons are of the shallow variety, so the rope of putty would stick to the back of the escutcheon and stick it to the wall with nothing showng on the outside.

    As far as the plastic ones go, I considered them, but I think the metal look far better, especially on a pedestal sink where they're out in the open. I find that the corrosion cleans up pretty easily with a plastic dish scrubber.
     
  6. Verdeboy

    Verdeboy In the Trades

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    One "trick" might be to wrap a little tape over the pipe that the eccutcheons fit over, thus increasing the outer diameter of the pipe. Then push the escutcheons over this "fatter" section of pipe. This works for bifold pins that are too small for the hole, so maybe it will work for 'scutcheons.
    Eric
     
  7. maddfrog

    maddfrog New Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2006
    Location:
    California
    that may do the trick

    I'll give the tape trick a try - may be all it needs...
     
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