Rust at AC line connection to coil

Discussion in 'HVAC Heating & Cooling' started by NCRealtor, Mar 7, 2008.

  1. NCRealtor

    NCRealtor New Member

    Mar 7, 2008
    Quick question..... my clients just had an inspection done on a property.

    The inspector said there was "rusting at the AC line connection to the coil."

    what will happen if this is left alone? Photo coming shortly.
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2008
  2. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Aug 31, 2004
    Cave Creek, Arizona

    If he means the electrical connection to the contactor, then probably nothing. If he means the air conditioning tubing connection to the condenser or evaporator coil, then you will eventually have a failure and the refrigerant will leak out.
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  4. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Sep 2, 2004
    Retired Systems engineer for defense industry.
    New England
    I thought all of the refrigerant connections to the coil were copper...that won't rust, although it could corrode.
  5. Nubbin

    Nubbin New Member

    Mar 30, 2008
    E Coils

    Evaporator coils are made of soft metals that conduct heat well. Aluminum, Copper need steel plates to hold it all in place. Most often the steel will rust first and then corrode the copper later. It could be several years before it leaks refrigerant, or yesterday :eek:
    If the rust is actually caused buy an older style drain pan, ... does Noah ring a bell?
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