Running PEX for the first time in a beach cabin

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by robyndh, Apr 4, 2013.

  1. robyndh

    robyndh New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    texas
    Hey and thanks in advance to all! I am running plumbing in our beach cabin and using PEX for the first time. I've been monitoring other construction utilizing it and have been researching it online, and while I've learned quite a bit am still at a loss for a few things. Particularly with regards to the supply line. Background...the run from the main from the street will be less than 50 feet..then up the pilings to the cabin is another 15 feet...this goes in straight under the water heater area, which is in the bathroom...all of the plumbing in the bathroom is on the same wall and opposite wall to the last run to the shower is the kitchen sink (this is all of the plumbing in the cabin), so the run once in the house is less than 30 feet. My question is can you use PEX to run out to the main and if so, what size? 1" seems to be the consensus, but some disagree. I would prefer to use the PEX as opposed to PVC as my previous experience at the beach with PVC is that there is more breakage (when it freezes and the houses sway). I would, of course, need to encase the PEX in PVC from the house into the ground to the main, but this, I believe would alleviate the bursting issues...any thoughts? Also, any reason why they haven't come out with a similar PEX product for sewage? Or in this case...septic? One more thing...any problems to speak of for venting under the eaves on the side of the house? I'd rather not go through the roof (metal)... Thanks, again for any help.

    Robyn
  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,994
    Location:
    New England
    Pex generally will survive a freezing episode, but fittings may not. Pex is quite flexible (one of the reasons it's easier to install with few fittings - you can snake it into places you would need multiple fittings with rigid pipe), and is probably one of the main reasons it would be lousy for a drainage system...you want that to be rigid so you can maintain nice, smooth slopes so gravity can do its thing transporting the waste away. Supply line sizes are often dictated by local codes based on what's in the building (i.e., the number of baths, toilets, etc.).
  3. robyndh

    robyndh New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    texas
    Very valid point on the sewage, Jim. Don't know why it hadn't occurred to me that it would just make it more difficult :confused: I think fittings-wise it should be okay...I don't think there will be any outside, that are above ground...and I live inSE Texas, so it's not like it freezes regularly! Thanks for your response, I will probably just head down there and scope out other houses that are being built and see what they are using...as it's only one bathroom and a kitchen sink utilizing water, I think and inch will do...Thanks, again...
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