Rough inspection - DWV what is needed?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by lucy, Feb 16, 2006.

  1. lucy

    lucy Guest

    I've been trying to research just what goes on in a rough inspection (this is my first). Water seems to be pretty straighforward. But I need some basic advice about the DWV.

    What I understand is that all of the DWV everthing needs to be sealed in some way and 5 pounds of air pressure introduced. Can somebody tell me the RIGHT way to seal the following:

    A. 2-inch ABS vent risers out my roof?
    B. ABS toilet flange and 1 installed operating toilet.
    C. ABS SanT openings for 3 lav sinks
    D. 2 bowl kitchen sink (installed) with disposal and strainer basket (not a real stopper)
    E. Utility sink (installed)
    F. ABS 2 part (mud) shower drain
    G. ABS tub drain with overflow

    Should I assume this should be sealed and pressurized before the inspector arrives? Besides having the water and the gas on...is there anything else that I need to do?

    Thanks - please be as specific as you can!

    Lucy
  2. Cass

    Cass Plumber

    Messages:
    5,980
    Location:
    Ohio
    #1 2" out the roof is not code here, I think it will have to be changed to 3" and a cap installed over it that will be cut off later OR a test ball inflated inside of each.

    #2 Remove toilet and plug with test ball.

    #3 3 san Ts will have to be pluged with test ball or capped.

    #4 kitchen sink needs to be disconnected and capped or ball inflated.

    #5 utility sink dito.

    #6 shower drain dito.

    #7 Tub drain dito.

    #8 all plumbing has to be exposed for inspection.

    I know 5 # doesn't sound like much but If you don't close the openings right you could have a pressure release explosion and someone could get hurt.

    You will also need a pump and test gauge hooked to the system.

    I recomend you get a plumber to do this ( rough inspection)for you.
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2006
  3. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

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    rough

    From your descsription, an operating toilet and kitchen sink, you must be well past the normal rough inspection point, or this is an addition. Here we use a water test with all the pipes filled to the roof with water. It is an easier test to do and also easier to find any leaks. Obviously you have to disconnect any fixtures and cap all openings, with a test ball in the sewer where it leaves the building.
  4. Cass

    Cass Plumber

    Messages:
    5,980
    Location:
    Ohio
    I would not recomend a water test if the area is finished or any where near being finished as a failure could / would flood the home.
  5. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,148
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    test

    The area should not be anywhere near finished if this is really a "rough" test of the plumbing before the drywall, etc. is installed.
  6. lucy

    lucy Guest

    This is an addition of an upstairs bath and a remodel of 1st floor bath. So although the bathroom areas I've worked on don't have any finish - the areas beneath and around them do! Your point about flooding the house is pretty important!

    The kitchen sink, utility sink and another bath are existing and I really didn't plan on having to remove those fixtures! So whenever you add 1 new fixture you have to remove 2 or 3 toilets?? Yikes!

    All of my new work goes to new vents so maybe I can just not fill up the old vents with water...but if they make me is there a way to do a water test without removing all of the existing fixtures?

    So let me see if I understand: there are 2 tests AIR or WATER FILL and it is up to my locality to decide what I get. For both tests I'm going to guess that I need to stop up the sewer by a ballon shoved down through the last cleanout. Is this right?

    Once all of the fixtures are removed or disconnected I then cap each opening with a "test ball" or a "cap" (which is guess is glued into place?). Is there also something called a "test plug"? Which of the 2 or 3 methods work best in various situations?

    If a water test is what I need to have in this area (Portland Oregon) would you say that an air test would be a way for me to do my own safety check of my new work before actually filling it with water?

    thanks for the advice!
    Lucy
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 17, 2006
  7. Cass

    Cass Plumber

    Messages:
    5,980
    Location:
    Ohio
    You only need to test the new fixtures. You will need to balloon off the new plumbing where it connects to the old. I think you should use air not water for the test. The new vents, if they are going out the roof, will have to be 3", ballooned / capped off. You will need a pump and pressure gauge for low pressure tests with air bleeder to let the air out after the test. You can use a bicycle pump if the system is not to big but a compressor is easier. Do the test once B4 you call for a rough inspection and leave the test on for at least 1 hour with no loss of pressure at all. Then you can call for the inspection.

    The final will be different. Not sure about there but here we do a rim test for the final test.

    Once you have the test on and while you are filling the system, do not stand in front of the gauge or any caps/ balloons incase they blow off. You can get hurt.

    Normaly a san T is stubed out and capped for the test. Then the stub is cut and the Desanco attatched. If you have the Desancos on now I'm not sure how safe a Female adp. screwed on to the desanco with a stub and cap would be for the test. I have never done that but maybe someone else has. I would think it would work / be safe.
  8. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,148
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    test

    If you planned ahead, you will have an opening just before the connection to the old system where you can insert a test plug so that you only have to test the new piping.
  9. lucy

    lucy Guest

    Help! How do I remove the balloon without a flood??

    Please help me again!

    I'm conducting the water test. I put a 3" balloon in my main sanitary drain in the basement. I have a "test tee" vertically right before it goes into the floor.

    I reach into the tee, put the balloon UP into the top of the tee so that the balloon blocks the water (I do not have a valve extension unlike the photo in the following link, but the first photo is basically what I am doing)

    http://www.cherneind.com/

    My question is: how can I remove the balloon without flooding my basement again? To get the balloon out I need to deflate it - and as soon as any air comes out of the balloon the force of the water causes it to slip out and MANY MANY GALLONS of the water in the vents and drains comes flooding out of the open threaded side of the test tee. The force of the backpressure is too great for me to stop it! I can't figure out how to get the water out of the drains to reduce the pressure and I can't seem to stop it from creating a gushing flood!

    thanks, lucy
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 5, 2010
  10. finnegan

    finnegan New Member

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    Location:
    CT
    Cherne makes a plug which threads into a test tee and then inflates, sealing off the pipe. When done testing, you deflate the ball and the water drains. After the water drains from the system, you unscrew the device. No splashing. You may want to consider installing a test tee if you do not have one. Good luck.

    http://www.cherneind.com/

    [​IMG]
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 5, 2010
  11. Mikey

    Mikey Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek

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    Crude but effective solution

    Take a rubber glove and stick it in the T, fingers first. Turn the glove's wrist over the T, and use a worm clamp to seal it. Stick your hand in the glove and do whatever you have to do to deflate the balloon -- enough to let water flow, at least, but be sure not to let the balloon fall into the drain. Be patient. When water stops flowing, take hand out of glove, etc.
  12. finnegan

    finnegan New Member

    Messages:
    250
    Location:
    CT
    Interesting. I don't know if I would trust it though. I can imagine letting go of the balloon. Have you tried it?
  13. Mikey

    Mikey Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek

    Messages:
    2,712
    Location:
    Central Florida
    No, but I've worked with several pieces of equipment that had such glove seals, under both positive and negative pressure, so it seemed like it should work. If you're nervous about letting go of the balloon, you could probably rig something on the downstream side of the T to catch it. I don't think you'd have to hang on to it for very long. Is it the situation that you've already inserted the balloon and filled the pipe, so it's too late to use Cherne's solution?
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2006
  14. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,148
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    ball

    Most test ball have a chain and ring on them so you can hold on to it while the water is trying to push it down the drain. Insert a stick or piece of pipe into the opening to hold the test ball in place against the water pressure. When the air is deflated the only water will be what can flow around the ball.

    [​IMG]
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 13, 2010
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