Residents of drought areas are being urged to conserve water

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by Terry, Jul 21, 2012.

  1. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,134
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    Governments and water utilities are beseeching — and sometimes requiring — people who live in drought areas to use less water. Among suggestions:

    •Install water-efficient fixtures.•Repair leaky plumbing.


    http://www.usatoday.com/weather/drought/story/2012-07-19/drought-conserve-water/56346454/1

    Just one more reason to change out old, dated plumbing for new more water efficient plumbing.
    I seem to recall hearing from those in the middle of the country that conserving
    water was no big deal. It seems like it is this Summer. I was recently talking to a farmer from Illinois the other day about his corn crop. During the Winter he had told me that it had been years and years since he had experienced a bad crop. The Winter had left snow on the ground, and this years crop was looking to be a bumper crop based on water on and in the ground. He had considered at one point laying in some irrigation for future dry days, and decided the extra expense wasn't on the plus side of the ledger. Now the crop is looking dry, and they are waiting for rain. Cattle are being brought to market early, some being fed the stalks of corn that have been given up on. Instead of corn fed beef, maybe stalk fed beef. I'm guessing beef will be plentiful this Fall.

    For those that are still wondering about saving water around the house. The new 1.28 gallon high performance commodes plug less often then the old 5.0 gallon bowls. You can have your cake and eat it too.
    I remember when my father was farming is Eastern Washington, we hauled our water in for household use. We ran a big circle, but that water came from an irrigation ditch. We swam in it, but if we pumped it into our trailer and used it to flush the toilet, funny things grew in the tank.

    Last edited: Jul 29, 2012
  2. TJanak

    TJanak Member

    Messages:
    155
    Location:
    South TX
    Water is eventually going to be the new oil. In some places it already is.

    Beef may be cheap this fall but long term the short corn crop and beef herd reduction this year in the midwest coupled with the drastic reduction from last year's drought in Texas will have long term impacts on beef prices. Get used to paying more.
  3. rvnmedic6869

    rvnmedic6869 New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Central NY
    We are on well water, the depth being ~165'.

    We conserve water by not flushing the toilet every time we pee. A radio talk guy once said back in the 1970s "if it's yellow, let it mellow; if it's brown, flush it down". I also don't water any plants outside unless my moisture probe shows the soil dry.

    But here's a question: I was told by a plumber last year that we shouldn't be conserving water as above, that the well needed to be "used". So, unless you have a dug well, should we or should we not conserve on our drilled well?

    Thanks,
    Bob
  4. DonL

    DonL Jack of all trades Master of one

    Messages:
    4,333
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    I always wondered why we don't have Water Pipelines just like Oil Pipelines.

    Seems like they could pipe some of the flood waters to places that have a drought.

    Both sides would benefit.
  5. Runs with bison

    Runs with bison Member

    Messages:
    892
    Location:
    Midwest
    It isn't like you are letting it sit stagnant in the well or pipes for extended periods. Most likely the usage reduction you mentioned is rather small. Even extensive water usage reduction is likely to not exceed 50% of your normal base rate.
  6. TJanak

    TJanak Member

    Messages:
    155
    Location:
    South TX
    Lots of people need jobs and the government likes to spend money, let's get crackin'! At least it would be a useful expenditure.

    Remember last year how the Missouri and Mississippi rivers had catastrophic flooding and Texas and the south were in a historic drought? Pipeline.
  7. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,134
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    We pulled a bowl the other day that had quit flushing. The trapway was filled with salt from the urine, and it was also filling the drain pipe. The same thing happens on water-less urinals. Without some water rinse, it fills with salt.

    [​IMG]

    A drain line being with with salt deposits from urine.
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2012
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