Replacing Galvanized drop pipe... Need advice

Discussion in 'Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog' started by jimc91, Oct 27, 2010.

  1. jimc91

    jimc91 DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Florida Panhandle
    I need some advice from you professionals. I just pulled up 147 feet of galvanized 1 inch drop pipe (man that stuff is heavy) and my 1 HP submersible pump. The well appears to be about 225 feet deep and the water level is about 42 feet from the top of the well casing. The first 6 sections of pipe looked almost new but the last section attached to the pump was coated in a red thick mud substance above the seal just above the brass check valve. The pump did not have this stuff on it, all of the muck seemed to be on that one section of pipe. (well is at least 10 years old I think, I just bought the property about 1 year ago. I would like to buy a roll of black poly pipe and am curious about what specs to ask for and if you guys think this is advisable. Also, should I consider lowering the new pump more than 147 feet? Any advice would be great!

    [​IMG]
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2010
  2. ballvalve

    ballvalve General Engineering Contractor

    Messages:
    3,261
    Location:
    northfork, california
    I would use 160 or 200 PSI Poly pipe and set it about 20 fet up after testing where the bottom really is. Be sure to learn WHAT fittings to use and HOW to get the pipe on without damaging it. Don't use a torch to heat it. Buy expensive clamps NOT from home depoop.
  3. WellHead

    WellHead Mechanical Engineer

    Messages:
    34
    Location:
    Arizona
    Hi,

    I'd be interested in a picture of what you used to pull the pipe. I have a second well and would like to pull the pump but the local well-guy wanted $200 to haul the pump up. That well is no longer in use but I would like some practice at pulling the pump.

    Thanks in advance.
  4. masterpumpman

    masterpumpman New Member

    Messages:
    729
    Location:
    Virginia Beach, VA
    I like using Polypipe 200# or better and using good quality brass or stainless steel fittings and at least 2 clamps on the fittings. Use only 1 check valve at the pump.

    The red mud looking stuff on the drop pipe is probably iron oxide and not a serious problem in your case. The area where it was worse is the area where the water in the well rises and lowers as the well is pumped (also not a problem).

    If you are considering replacing the tank I would recommend consider a Pside-Kick http://www.cyclestopvalves.com/pdf/psidekick-brochure.pdf
  5. jimc91

    jimc91 DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Florida Panhandle
    Thanks for the reply. I have been able to find 160 PSI locally and bought a 100 foot roll today. The local supplier will have more available next week but 200 PSI is not available from them. In working with the 100 PSI pipe I found soaking the end of the pipe in warm water make it much easier to insert fittings. I hope this is the case with the 160 PSI as well. The clamps I have a stainless steel made by IDEAL here in the USA... Would you consider these good clamps? I dropped a fishing weight (8 QZ) down the well case until it stopped falling. Pulled up the line and it measured 225 feet. I also dropped a pill bottle down the well case and marked it on the line and then measured it. Looks like the water level is down about 42 feet. Do I understand your response that I should set the pump at 200 to 205 feet?

    Thanks for your thoughts.

    JC
  6. jimc91

    jimc91 DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Florida Panhandle
    Thank you for your reply. Good to hear the red mucky stuff is not a problem. I have a new bladder tank that was installed last year that appears to be working good so I will continue to use it until it has a problem. I like the idea of brass fittings and 2 clamps per connection. I hope to test the pump tomorrow to see if it is still within specs or need replacing. It is a Sta-Rite signature 2000. I found the book and downloaded it this morning with all of the values for this pump so I am hoping it passes all of the tests and I can use it. I had a local well driller put down a new well to run my house on and will use this old deep well to supply water for my greenhouse and field irrigation. Thank you for the tips, this is my first encounter diagnosing and repairing a deep well with a submersible.

    JC
  7. Texas Wellman

    Texas Wellman In the Trades

    Messages:
    523
    Location:
    SE Texas-Coastal
    $200? I would jump all over that one. What price can you attach to either a bad back or a dropped and now stuck pump.


  8. ballvalve

    ballvalve General Engineering Contractor

    Messages:
    3,261
    Location:
    northfork, california
    3 clamps usually fit and are a better idea. Use the hot water on the pipe and retorque with a socket a hour after first install.

    210 ' can work too.
  9. WellHead

    WellHead Mechanical Engineer

    Messages:
    34
    Location:
    Arizona
    It is a well I no longer need nor use, well, other than washing the truck occassionally. It does have a near new F&W pump that stopped working after burping up about 20-lbs of red mud. The pump motor still runs and draws normal Amps (11.9) so I assume the check valve or lift pipe has clogged. Maybe sheared off the pump drive.

    I don't want to spend money on it and being retired, I have the time to play. If I drop it cest la vie. Still no worse off.

    Harry
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