Removing "plug" on Oatey TKO flange

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by BobL43, Feb 21, 2012.

  1. BobL43

    BobL43 DIY Senior Member

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    1,799
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    OK, it seemed simple enough: I bought an Oatey TKO toilet flange with the stainless steel swivel ring on it. I wanted to remove the test seal molded into it because I'm just replacing the bend and the flange, and no test was going to be performed. So simple, even a picture is on the label showing where to hit the raise rim of the "seal" and then grab it with a pair of Channellock® pliers I figured it would be best to do it before gluing in in place and hitting the ring with the hammer and maybe damaging my newly installed porcelain floor tiles. I hit it easy at first, and it laughed at me I hit it harder, it just did not want to break where it made thin and was supposed to break at. I hit it harder yet on the raised area and the entire thing split all the way through vertically, even through the socket part that goes over a 3" PVC pipe. Actually, I had a short stub of PVC pipe inserted in the bottom of the flange, which probably wedged the whole thing open past its breaking point. A new one is very cheap, only around 6 bucks at Orange box store, but I don't want to break the new one. I guess it should be done with a piece of wood under the bottom (hub) of the flange and then stuck with the hammer? I am almost embarassed to ask this, but I thought others (none pros) would run into this situation without knowing how. A few years ago, I guess I would have been too macho too ask, I would have just bought maybe a dozen pieces and keep breaking one at a time until I did it correctly, but now, I am soixante neuf, (not the position) and will ask in front of all you guys, and not worry about it:eek: :p
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2012
  2. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

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    That's a first. I've always tapped the outer raised edge to break the seal and then lifted up.
  3. BobL43

    BobL43 DIY Senior Member

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    Well, that's what tried Terry, but maybe this one had too much plastic in that area of the mold. It should have broken easily, but?
  4. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

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    15,442
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    It doesn't appear to move very much. You almost have to listen for it, and then lift.
    Sucks that the entire fitting broke though.
  5. Hackney plumbing

    Hackney plumbing Homeowner

    Messages:
    1,174
    Location:
    Alabama
    Maybe it was cold. When pvc gets cold its brittle. Want to cause trouble go out to a large slab rough in on a cold winter day with a few bowling balls. Its nasty.
  6. BobL43

    BobL43 DIY Senior Member

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    No, it was at room temp of 68 F.

    Gonna return it to Big Orange as defective and hope they give me a hard time, so I can have some fun showing them receipts of how much I spent there in 2011 that I could now spend at big Blue:p
  7. BobL43

    BobL43 DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,799
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    You are that cruel to your competition?
  8. BobL43

    BobL43 DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
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    I stopped in at HD yesterday afternoon and exchanged the broken flange for a new one with no headaches. When I got the new one home, I placed it on a sheet of plywood and hit the raised part as per instructions. It took some rather not gentle blows and I could see it fracture where it was supposed to, and removed the plug easily. I suppose the original that split would not have, if it had a piece of 3 inch PVC solvent welded into to. Apparently, the short piece I had inserted into the original but not cemented it in, just wedged the flange open like a log splitting wedge.

    Was:mad:, but now:D
  9. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,348
    Location:
    New England
    PVC (and ABS) drain sockets are an interference fit (tapered)...the bottom is narrower than the pipe you are trying to insert. Dry fitting is like inserting a wedge into the end of a log...it tends to split things! Only when you apply the cement, which melts the plastic, does it actually fit without excess pressure. When the solvent evaporates, it is welded together.
  10. BobL43

    BobL43 DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,799
    Location:
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    I thought I said the same thing in my post. maybe I'm mistaken because I used different words. However, it took enough hammer banging to crack the new one enough to grasp it and pul the plug out, that I would not want to do it on a nice newly tiled floor

    Thanks anyway Jim:)
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