Recommendation for a WH tempering valve brand/type

Discussion in 'Water Heater Forum, Tanks' started by jadnashua, Dec 4, 2013.

  1. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    My mother typically doesn't use a lot of hot water, but her house tends to be the gathering point around holidays, and her smallish WH is then not adequate if a bunch of people are staying over if anyone spends more than a 'reasonable' time in the shower. So, next time I go back, I was thinking about installing a tempering valve so we can safely raise the storage temp with people staying to extend its usefullness. It's an old house with 1/2" pipes most places (including in/out of the WH).

    So, what tempering valves are reliable and come in 1/2"? Benefits of one over the other?
  2. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

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    I like Honeywell.
    They come in all sizes, including 1/2" with is great for point of use.

    http://www.terrylove.com/forums/sho...atic-Mixing-Valves-(-water-heater-tempering-)

    I installed two Apollo valves last year that I had to return. I could not stop them from leaking. Not even after several trips on each one. The fourth trip I replaced them with Honeywell, my normal brand, and all is well with the world now.
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2013
  3. DonL

    DonL Jack of all trades Master of one

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    That is a nice problem to have Jim.

    Not many have the pleasure of a visit and to stay with their Loved ones.


    Honeywell gets my vote.


    Or tell them to stay at a Hotel. My bad
  4. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    In looking at the specs on the AM-100C-US valve, it says minimum flow 0.5gpm. When you have a faucet set to warm (say at a vanity), the hot volume could easily be less than that. Any idea what the regulated temperature of the thing is? Does it end up all cold coming out, or what? I'd hope it was proportional, but realize it may not be able to regulate much at low flow rates, but all cold until it reached some level would not be appreciated, and I may have to rethink putting one in at all.

    It appears that the 3/4" version is more readily available, and often cheaper...would it make sense to just use reducers to the existing 1/2" pipe, or spend the extra money an just buy a 1/2" version (if I can find one easily).

    Thoughts, experience?
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2013
  5. Cynicalguy

    Cynicalguy New Member

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    Mixing valve

    Would a mixing valve make my 50 gallon water heater last through a bath and doing laundry and dishes longer given I could really turn the heat up. I assume it would recover faster. And what size would I need given my pipes? Thanks

    photo (15).jpg
  6. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    A tempering valve effectively functions as a virtually larger tank because for every hotter gallon you draw out of it, you mix it with some cold, so you are using less water from the tank to achieve the same volume of cooler water. The standby losses are greater (they increase with bigger differences in surfaces - the insulation slows it down, but isn't as effective with higher temperatures), and it may not change the recovery time, since it has to heat the incoming cold water more, but until it cools off too far to be useful, yes, it functions as a larger tank...may make a 40-gallon tank look like a 50-gallon one, for example.
  7. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

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    A tempering valve allows you to mix down 180 water with cold down to 120
    That gives you a lot more usable water.
    If you had a 50 set at 120, ran it up to 180 and mixed down, it would store 75 gallons that way.

    Honeywell 3/4"
  8. Cynicalguy

    Cynicalguy New Member

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    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 15, 2013
  9. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    At some point, Honeywell and Sparko co-branded the things (I do not know when that changed) and some are listed as Honeywell, and some as Honeywell-Sparko, but the other differences are in two areas - the pipe size and fitting type, and the adjustable range. Code wants a max of 120-degrees, and the one most often recommended for WH tempering has a top limit of 120. Then, there's one for up to about 140. There's also a third, primarily for heating systems (boilers, etc.) that can go higher. Those are outlet temperatures, not inlet.

    How much 'bigger' the tank appears will depend on how hot you set it. The nice thing about the tempering valve, is that it keeps the outlet you use about the same temp. You should check and maybe readjust if you change the WH setting, though.
  10. Cynicalguy

    Cynicalguy New Member

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    Which is better and what is the difference. Honeywell R-AM-101C-US-1 VS Honeywell AM101C .
  11. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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  12. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    They appear they may be the same thing, but the picture isn't correct if it is, the US part means Union-Sweat, and it sure looks like that has a threaded connection in the picture (but they don't always use the proper picture!). The spec sheet does not list that exact part number. Since the spec sheet is from the manufacturer, and their website, I'd hope it is the latest.

    If you stay with the same pipe size, and the came temp range, the differences are in how you connect it to your plumbing...do you want to add more joints and put in threaded bits, or solder the union on...your choice. Or, call them, and ask.
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