Protective clothing

Discussion in 'Ian's Corner' started by Ian Gills, Apr 12, 2009.

  1. Ian Gills

    Ian Gills Senior Robin Hood Guy

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    I have just cut my finger while trimming metal studs. Which reminds me I should wear my gloves and goggles more often.

    What protective clothing due you wear for your remodelling work?

    pizap_com0_1653878609649837.jpg
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2009
  2. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

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    Bothell, Washington
    Nice updated picture you have of me.

    But you should know, the first rule of keeping all of your fingers is

    No beer on the jobsite.

    I worked one very hot Summer near Lake Union on a four story condo complex. The framers were drinking beer all day, because it was so hot.
    The plumbers showed up at 6:00, and got off at 2:30 to beat the heat.
    We were drinking water.
    One day the head framer fell two stories into the elevator pit.
    He was pretty messed up, but came back a few days later with casts on his leg and an arm.
    Beer is never touched while working with tools, that's the first safety rule.

    As I got older, I started seeing that protecting the eyes was important.
    I got scolded pretty bad by an eye doctor. You have those things for life, so you might as well take care of them.
    Gloves for sure, unless it's Friday and near quitting time.
    Then the last thing you do at the end of the day, is start gluing ABS without gloves.
    Then you can show off your glued up hands all weekend long just to let people know what a slob you are. It's pretty cool to be picking off black ABS glue from your hands in church. You feel like a real Homer Simpson.

    Learn to lift correctly, and when to drop things to save your back.
    You can buy new water heaters, they're are cheaper then doctor bills and loss of work.
    Learn to ask for help sometimes, even if one person can barely lift it.
    And when you lift with two people, it's not a competition. Lift evenly and let the other guy know what you are doing. Communicate.

    Don't run down mountain passes with 50 pounds on your back and crummy hiking boots. At least buy the best boots. Having an ankle cast for six weeks and missing work kind of sucks.
    It also makes it kind of hard to play defensive back when you pull the cast off. I swear, it takes weeks to get all of the range back in your ankle.

    Don't dive back to first base head first, at least not after pulling on two foot pipe wrenches all week overhead on fire protections systems. Let your ligaments resettle back in before testing them to the max.

    When you fall on concrete,
    Roll
    don't put your arm out like somehow it's going to stop 200 pounds without breaking the wrist. At least if you do, you have plenty of time to practice your left handed layin's while you are missing work.

    Somebody said
    Ear protection!
    And I said

    "What?"

    Yeah, and water, no alcohol.
  3. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

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    ?

    don't put your arm out like somehow it's going to stop 200 pounds without breaking the wrist. At least if you do, you have plenty of time to practice your left handed layin's while you are missing work.

    The alternative to breaking your wrist is caving your face or ribs in. Those casts are worse than one on your wrist.
  4. kingsotall

    kingsotall Plunger/TurdPuncher

    I would recommend a hard hat for you. We wouldn't want any brain damage to occur that would affect you being able to start even more wonderful posts at this here forum. :)
  5. Scuba_Dave

    Scuba_Dave Extreme DIY Homeowner

    Messages:
    885
    Location:
    South of Boston, MA
    I make sure I wear glasses especially whennailing galvy nails
    I had a small chip in the eye once, didn't really know it until the next day. No damage but I learned my lesson

    Gloves don't stop a hammer from hitting your thumb :(

    I wear sneakers, usually a long sleeve shirt unless really hot
    Most of the timeI have a hat on, keeps the sawdust out of what little hair I have
    No booze - warm weather I drink lots of water
    I usually slide heavy loads up the ladder
    (4) 606 skylights were lotsa fun :eek:

    My last house was the 1st time I was roofing up high - 2nd story
    I tied a rope around my waist to the ridge beam :D
    After bit I felt better & took it off
    I did have a 2x at the edge of the roof in case I slipped

    I do make sure I tie off my ladders so they can't slip
    Sort of a pain putting up 2x12 x 20' rafters by myself...only 2 left
  6. GabeS

    GabeS Remodel Contractor

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Brooklyn NY
    If you get tired, stop working.

    If you get impatient with a particular task, go outside and take a 5 minute break, then come back and you'll be surprised how much easier the same task just became.

    Bend your knees when lifting, not your back.

    Don't ever forget to leave the hammer on top of the ladder. :eek: ouch.
  7. Scuba_Dave

    Scuba_Dave Extreme DIY Homeowner

    Messages:
    885
    Location:
    South of Boston, MA
    Excellent advice
    When installing my LVL's I limited myself to one set a day
    On the 16" x 24' I did only 2 in one day
    The next day I put the 3rd up
    I also would build my walls one day, then raise it the next day
    The rest of the day I would spend building the next wall(s)
    The only time I had a problem was when I rushed & tried to get a large wall section up at the end of the day - too tired
  8. roofcoatings

    roofcoatings Guest

    Very funny! I really like this pic.
  9. Cass

    Cass Plumber

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    5,980
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    Ohio
    Near the top of a ladder there are words that say NOT A STEP...guess what...it isn't...
  10. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    protective gear

    When communicating, be sure you are both on the same page. Be certain, when you say, "when I nod my head, you hit it", that he knows you mean the chisel.
  11. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

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    I remember plumbing for a restaurant on Phinney Ave near the Zoo that had burned.
    Yes, don't stand on the top of the six foot tripod ladder while plumbing.

    I remember losing my balance, reaching for the lath on the wall, having the lath come off in my hands, my shoulder dislocating on the way down, and then landing with a thud on the concrete below on my back side.

    I started going into shock from the pain of it.
    I packed up my tools and was done for the day.

    If you need to be that high, get a taller ladder.
  12. Ian Gills

    Ian Gills Senior Robin Hood Guy

    Messages:
    2,780
    Location:
    USA
    Or get a taller lad up the ladder.

    My 5'4" wife does the most tricky ladder jobs. I just hold it.

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