Pro's and con's of 4" dia. well

Discussion in 'Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog' started by Shooter45, Mar 26, 2011.

  1. Shooter45

    Shooter45 New Member

    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    MS
    I am about to have a new well drilled at our new construction home. What are the pros and cons if any of having the 4" over a 2"? The well will need to be able to satisfy 3 water loving girls at the house. Also should I consider any filters or purifiers?
    TIA
  2. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa DIYer, not in the trades

    Messages:
    4,080
    Location:
    NW Ontario, Canada
    Reading the title I thought you were undecided between a 4" and a 6" casing. 2" limits your options way too much WRT deep well pumping. I would advise a 6" casing so that you are not limited with what submersible you can use.

    Filters/purifiers will of course depend on the water quality. I would start by asking the neighbors questions about their wells, how deep they are, where the water table is, and what the water quality is. Ask them if they treat their water and ask for a sample of untreated water to take for analysis.
  3. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,873
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    A pump, depending on ITS size, can get stuck in a 4" casing after several years. Anything smaller could be a disaster when the pump has to be removed.
  4. Texas Wellman

    Texas Wellman In the Trades

    Messages:
    537
    Location:
    SE Texas-Coastal
    Sounds like your area is similar to ours. Basically a 2" well is only cheaper when it is installed. A 4" well will give you a much longer pump life, more water, and use less energy. A jet pump is a big energy waster, and you'll be limited to 8-12 GPM, unless you have a really high water level.

    I have very rarely seen a submersible stuck in a 4" well, especially if it's a pvc well. Make sure you use sch 80 PVC drop pipe with good couplings.
  5. Texas Wellman

    Texas Wellman In the Trades

    Messages:
    537
    Location:
    SE Texas-Coastal
    Here's why a 4" well is far superior to 2"....

    The submersible pump...
    will never freeze
    will never lose prime
    is water cooled and completely sealed. No bugs to get in the motor, no worries on hot days, and is a lot easier to hide.
    Twice as efficient. My rule is thumb is that a jet to submersible is a 2x deal. In other words, a 1-HP jet would be equivalent to a 1/2 HP sub. Actually it's a little more efficient than that, but 2x makes it simple.
    Much quieter. I doubt you will even know it's running unless you're really paying attention.
    Just in general lasts much longer by my experience.

    The only advantage of the jet pump is that they are cheaper to install and the pump can be serviced without pulling the whole drop-line. On the downside you'll have a jet and leathers/footvalve down in the well that will have to be replaced periodically. Also, since the motors are not sealed and are air cooled they are much more likely to get critters up in there. I have found small snakes, lizzards, and countless dirt dobber nests. Not uncommon for the well to lose prime after the power has been out for a few hours.
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2011
  6. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
    3,250
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    Ask about drilling a 6". If he's got the rig for it the added material cost should be minimal but give you more water and better serviceability.

    There is no reason to plan for anything else until you find out what the water quality and capacity is.
  7. Texas Wellman

    Texas Wellman In the Trades

    Messages:
    537
    Location:
    SE Texas-Coastal
    I'ver never heard of a 6" well for domestic use in the south. I can't speak for Mississippi but I have a feeling that the 4" well could produce 100 gpm if necessary.

    The whole "stuck pump in 4" is over-blown. We are exclusively 4" here and I have seen very few, if any, stuck pumps in pvc wells. The only exception is if the pump was left to run dead-headed and a few pump malfunctions that were covered by the manufacturer. They replaced the well.
  8. justwater

    justwater Well Drilling/Service

    Messages:
    327
    Location:
    FL/GA
    here, 6" for residential use is unheard of as well. i also think the pumps stuck in 4" is overblown, especially in PVC. the very few times i have ever seen it was when someone deadheaded the pump for a long time.

    i'd definitely shoot for the 4" over a 2" and go with a submersible pump. you will be much happier in the long run. more efficient, more water, more pressure, never lose prime.
  9. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa DIYer, not in the trades

    Messages:
    4,080
    Location:
    NW Ontario, Canada
    Here, 6" is the norm. The recovery rate of the well is not really proportional to the diameter of the casing, but the size of the casing determines the storage capacity.
  10. justwater

    justwater Well Drilling/Service

    Messages:
    327
    Location:
    FL/GA
    i understand. storage capacity isnt even thought of here because wells usually produce plenty of water
  11. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa DIYer, not in the trades

    Messages:
    4,080
    Location:
    NW Ontario, Canada
    Around here, the choice somtimes comes down to deciding whether to go down another 100 - 200 feet in hopes of hitting a better vein or hydrofracking to increase production on the one you hit.
  12. justwater

    justwater Well Drilling/Service

    Messages:
    327
    Location:
    FL/GA
    i'd feel better going deeper rather than hydrofracking (i'm not convinced it works as well, especially longterm), ..but my opinion isnt worth much on it because low producers are strange to me. i never have to install a pump that cant be ran full flow for as long as a customer desires.
  13. Shooter45

    Shooter45 New Member

    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    MS
    Thanks guys. None of the installers have mentioned the 6". Only 2 or 4.
  14. Shooter45

    Shooter45 New Member

    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    MS
    Talked to the installer again today and he is going to put down a 4" with 1 1/2hp submersible and a 220 gal tank. Does this sound ok?
  15. Waterwelldude

    Waterwelldude Well driller,pump repair. and septic installer

    Messages:
    303
    Location:
    Texas
    That is about the best setup you can have for a home. You'll have enough water for the house and if you wanted too, you could put in a sprinkler system. Providing he uses an 18-20gpm pump
  16. Shooter45

    Shooter45 New Member

    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    MS
    Think he said the pump should do 25gpm.
  17. justwater

    justwater Well Drilling/Service

    Messages:
    327
    Location:
    FL/GA
    is that a bladder/diaphragm tank (if so, do you know brand?) ..or a galvanized tank?
  18. Waterwelldude

    Waterwelldude Well driller,pump repair. and septic installer

    Messages:
    303
    Location:
    Texas
    A 25gpm 1.5hp pump, and 220 tank. That is the setup I would go with.
  19. Shooter45

    Shooter45 New Member

    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    MS
    Not sure. I'll check tomorrow. Is one better than the other?
  20. justwater

    justwater Well Drilling/Service

    Messages:
    327
    Location:
    FL/GA
    i agree.. just wondering if its an actual 220gal galvanized tank or a 220 equivalent bladder/diaphram. .. not that it matters much i guess.
Similar Threads: Pro's con's
Forum Title Date
Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog Test question for you pro's..... Jun 4, 2007

Share This Page