prevent siphoning out.

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by willl, Mar 21, 2007.

  1. willl

    willl New Member

    Messages:
    89
    Location:
    North Dakota
    I got a pump that pumps water out of a pond. The piping is 2" but I can go smaller if I need too. Problem is when you turn on the pump and then turn it off it will continue to siphon out. How can I prevent this? Do they make an antisiphon thingy for it. Thanks:D
  2. markts30

    markts30 Commercial Plumber

    Messages:
    630
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    A simple atmospheric vacuum break (valve) should do the trick...
    Someone correct me if I am wrong...
  3. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,615
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    siphon

    If l am interpreting your question properly, a simple atmospheric air vent, (they go by many different brand names, ProVent, Studor, etc.), used in plumbing system will seal while the pump is running and open when it shuts off to break the siphonage.
  4. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    How far is the outlet of the siphon below the level of the pond?

    Where is the pump relative to the surface of the pond, and relative to the high point in the pipe coming out of the pond? If you break the siphon, will it cause the pump to lose prime?
  5. willl

    willl New Member

    Messages:
    89
    Location:
    North Dakota
    I am guessing from the level of the pond to the place where it is pump out is about 6 to 8 feet. The pump is a simple submersible pump on the bottom and the pipe connects to the pump goes up and over the water surface by about one foot and then tapers off downward to the place of discharge where it is roughly 6 to 8 feet below water surface. thanks
  6. willl

    willl New Member

    Messages:
    89
    Location:
    North Dakota
    Searching the internet for this valve becuase I am never going to find it locally I think I found it on mcmaster.com. Would something like this work in the 2". They aren't cheap though. about 80 dollars

    http://picasaweb.google.com/Rob.a.jesse/MyPictures/photo#5045172456907698482.

    Also if this is best for my application how does one install it. I am assuming that the part that looks like a hat needs to be ontop and installed vertically and the arrow represents the direction of water flow and that part of the elbow with the arrow on it will be installed horizontally. And this valve needs to be at the highest point in the piping. Thank you
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 23, 2007
  7. markts30

    markts30 Commercial Plumber

    Messages:
    630
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    100% correct...
    The bottom of the vacuum break has to be at least 6" above the highest outlet in your piping...
    In your case, you could put it where the pipe exits the pond prior to running downhill....
  8. willl

    willl New Member

    Messages:
    89
    Location:
    North Dakota
    Hi all,

    Haven't gotten around to order it yet. I was wondering if a pressure vacuum breaker would work even better. Don't know to much of a difference between the two but I read in a place that they are better. From the place I was looking at buying it from this was there description of it.

    2" Buckner Brass PVB

    New 2" PVB backflow preventor.

    Description
    2" female pipe thread inlet and outlet
    Use in constant pressure systems to prevent backflow
    Atmospheric backflow prevention
    5 psi loss at 120 GPM
    Bronze body for durability
    The PVB is designed to be installed to provide protection against backsiphonage of toxic or non-toxic liquids. It consists of a spring loaded check valve which closes when the pressure in the assembly drops below 1 PSI or when zero flow occurs, pls an air relief valve that opens to break a siphon when the pressure in the assembly drops to 1 PSI.
    Typical applications are to protect against health hazzard and non-health hazzard backsiphonage conditions in industrial plants, cooling towers, laboratories, laundries, swimming pools, and lawn sprinkler systems.


    Thanks as always:)
  9. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots Sprinkler Guy

    Messages:
    798
    Location:
    Metro NYC
    Describe your application in more detail. What's happening to this pumped water? What make and model of pump to you have?
  10. willl

    willl New Member

    Messages:
    89
    Location:
    North Dakota
    The water just gets pumped out into an area where trees, grass etc. grow. It is a Coleman 2" solids sewage pump, 6/10 hp, 115 volt, 155 gpm at 5' head. Model number is 60-AHSWP but I couldn't find it over then net. Thanks :cool:
  11. willl

    willl New Member

    Messages:
    89
    Location:
    North Dakota
    Anybody know this one. Essentially I was wondering if a pressure vacuum breaker is better than a atmospheric vacuum breaker for my application. I am also kinda curious to know the difference between the two. Thanks:)
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