Pressure Tank & other

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by Entropy, Feb 15, 2007.

  1. Entropy

    Entropy New Member

    Messages:
    24
    Location:
    Port Perry, Ontario, Cnd.
    Good Afternoon.

    My pressure tank needs to be replaced. Is this something I can do myself?

    I would greatly appreciate any advise on how to change it.

    I can solder myself, but I’m not sure about what to do when I have the other installed.
    There are valves to ‘isolate’ the pressure tank, which I assume is a good thing, but I might have to do some cutting and moving around if I buy a larger tank. Will I have to pressurize something? Set the on / off switch? Prime the pump? Release air from the lines? Fix an air lock (where might that occur)?

    This set up is in my house, there are two hoses coming out of the pump on the right side which go to the well I assume, and one that comes from the top that goes to the line which is connected to the pressure tank. Any idea what size of tank this might be? I was going to buy a brand from Canadian Tire “Diamond†are they o.k.?

    Also, is it easy to “re-pack†my iron filter, is this something I can do (if so where would I buy stuff to re-pack it with, or do I just clean it out)? Any Idea on where I would find manuals for the iron filter and water softer?

    I have very little available funds for this, so I would like to do it myself. Or, will I end up calling in a pro after I mess it up, and pay more .... Suggestions?

    Thanks
    Entropy


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  2. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    There should be only one connection to the tank. At that pipe coming out, there may be a union, which you can unscrew without disassembling all of the rest of the pipe. You then connect the pipe to the new tank and reconnect the union.

    If there is not a union, then you will probably want to cut the pipe at the inlet to the tank and reassemble with a union.

    Your alternative if there is no union and you don't want to install one, if it is copper, is to reassemble by soldering the assembly at installation.

    If you want a bigger tank, you should try to find a taller one with a diameter that will fit the space. However, it is possible to install the tank a few feet away in some convenient place. You need only one pipe to the tank, which flows both ways.

    Valves between pump and tank are "optional", and not really recommended because of the risk of having them closed when they should be open, causing distress to the pump and piping.

    For future reference, you have a deep well jet pump. That information will be handy when you come back here with a pump problem.
  3. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,323
    Location:
    New England
    Are you sure you need a new tank? What are your symptoms?
  4. Entropy

    Entropy New Member

    Messages:
    24
    Location:
    Port Perry, Ontario, Cnd.
    During the home inspection we had EcoWater from Port Perry do an inspection, the previous owner did put in a huge UV light (3 ft long), but did not follow through on repairing or replacing the tank (bladder is shot).

    Thanks for the info.

    If I take the pump appart do I have to prime it? If so, how?
  5. Rancher

    Rancher Guest

    You prime it thru the cap and nipple you see in your picture of the pump.

    Rancher
  6. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    You shouldn't have only one pipe to the tank, as there is now. When the pump is off, the water flows from the tank to the fixtures, then when the pump comes on, that water flow must turn 180* to flow into the tank, and when you are still using water when the pump stops, it has to reverse again. That causes silent water hammer which can cause problems for the pump. So the tank should be off the side of a tee on the pipe going from the pump, past the tank to the house.

    Putting unions on a pressure tank isn't going to help much next time you need to replace the tank. Most tanks change in design just enough to preclude a union from going back together next time. It's best to simply cut the pipe and redo it with a repair or regular coupler. There's no change of leaks or misalignent problems.

    The control valves on your filter and softener are Fleck valves; a 25x0 and a 5600. Yes you can take the mineral out of them and rebed them. They both look a bit small. If you rebed them, and something goes wrong with the control vavles, you need special tools to rebuild them so, if they are too small for your water quality and family size and/or house, you're better off replacing them by buying over the internet and installing the replacements yourself. Rebedding and rebuilding will cost 60-75% of new. And both of your valves may be proprietary, not standard off the shelf versions which might be hard to get parts or service for.

    There is an air bleed off valve behind the filter that I don't fully understand. Is there a venturie in the line from the well? They add air to the water. Or is there an air compressor I can't see?
  7. Entropy

    Entropy New Member

    Messages:
    24
    Location:
    Port Perry, Ontario, Cnd.
    Gary, thanks.

    I had a 'pro' come over, yes it is an 'air bleed off' valve which is supposed to be on top of a contact tank.

    There is an air injector on the line between the pump and the tank.

    The company said a new fiberglass pressure tank installed is $500, and that includes new line to and from with joints and valves.

    For me to do it will cost $250, and if something goes wrong in the middle of the night, I've got problems. For $500 it is warantied for 5 years, and it is their problem. I think I will go with this route.

    He also said that there is an "iron bacteria" in the well, lines, and equipment.
    Said I should treat with Purox, I'm going to do this next week.

    Thanks
    Entropy
  8. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    I said: "There should be only one connection to the tank." A union in the line where that connection goes to the tee makes it a lot easier to assemble when replacing the tank.

    The first time all the piping is assembled, it is easy to plan how to do it without a union. When replacing a tank in a system that was installed with iron pipe (I've done a few of those), it is a lot easier to do it with a union. I know it can be done by soldering up the fittings if copper is used in the tank connection.
  9. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    Entropy, he is BSing you. That tank has a 5 year manufacturers' warranty. The job is simple and no tank is going to bust in the middle of the night or otherwise unless it has a manufactiurer defect or you over pressurize it, which has nothing to do with the installation. Get another price somewhere else and do the installation yourself and enjoy the savings.

    Install the tank with a threaded tank tee; whoever you buy the tank from can supply the right tee for that type tank (IIRC 1" x 1" x 1.25"). The tee can come complete with a new pressure switch, switch nipple, PRV, pressure gauge and boiler drain for like $75-100. Then you don't have the water flowing two opposit directions like now.

    Yes BobNH I see you're right, you did say connection. But you didn't mean he should do it right with a tank tee.

    But a union anywhere on galvanized isn't going to help in the future replacement of a tank. Threaded unions can be very difficult for a DIYer to do right. Plus the fact galvanized causes water quality problems in many cases; along with flow reduction in acidic waters. And since nothing but threaded fittings can be used with it, galvanized is difficult to work with. IMO it should be outlawed for potable water use.

    I've been there many times, at customers, and have to SHOW them the difficulties in trying to reuse the union connection. It is much easier/quicker to remove the galvanized and use plastic or copper instead of attempting to reuse a union without moving it. And if you have to move it because the new tank will not align correctly, the job takes longer so what was the purpose of installing the union many years prior?

    Furthermore. People that post on the internet usually want to do the jobs themselves, so making it the simplest, easiest and quickest is in THEIR best interests. So those replying to them might want to look at it from the OPs' point of view.
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