Pressure Tank in Attic

Discussion in 'Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog' started by 41Fever, Mar 26, 2007.

  1. 41Fever

    41Fever New Member

    Messages:
    23
    Location:
    North Dakota
    I've got a seasonal cabin which is slab on grade. Every sqaure foot of floor space is valuable and was thinking of putting my pressure tank in the attic(Can probably keep 4 pairs of shoe's in that area if I put them on TOP of the 6 cases of beer!). Am I asking for problems with the heat up there? I would put it in a pan(water heater type) for condensation purposes with a drain to outside but am wondering if it's more trouble than it's worth. If I used a 100# relief valve on system would it be blowing off? Never had a relief valve on previous tank that was in place for 30+ years but that was inside the cabin. Appreciate any & all comments/suggestions.
    PS - I'd put the beer in the attic, but I use that more than the pressure tank - LOL
  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,129
    Location:
    New England
    Ceiling joists may not be strong enough for the concentrated load unless you put it over a load bearing wall. The bladder probably won't last as long in the heat. You may not like the hot water stored in the tank. Not sure why you'd need a T&P valve on it, but I'm not a pro, either, just giving you my thoughts.

    When I lived in Kuwait, we had a water tank on the roof, not enclosed - it was white fiberglass. In the hot season (about 8 months of the year!), we had to turn off the water heater and use the cold water from the roof for hot, it got that hot. God help you if you ran through the cold water in the tank inside otherwise, you'd end up wiht hot and hot on both sides. It got confusing trying to remember which way to get hot, especially for a few weeks when the stuff on the roof wasn't that hot, and you didn't want to turn the water heater back on yet when it got to what they call winter there!
  3. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,486
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    You did not say what size pump or tank you have. A seasonal cabin may not need a very large tank. If it is used with a Cycle Stop Valve you could probably use a tank as small as a one gallon milk jug. Then you would not have to put the tank in the attic.
  4. Bob1000

    Bob1000 New Member

    Messages:
    114
    Location:
    Egypt
    I totally agree with valve man , that is the best solution possible , you can then use the smallest pressure tank ever and if you still want to put it on the roof you can put it inside an extruded polystyrine box which will keep it from the excessive heat , the amount of "hot" water then will be minimal untill you run through the cold water again afte consuming that small volume in the tank
  5. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    If you have a jet pump, you probably don't need a relief valve, except if the tank is in the attic where it is going to act like a water heater if it gets waterlogged.

    The tank and the pressure switch should be near each other. That means if you put the tank in the attic, you should run wires to and from the pressure switch. Why not leave the tank outside? Where is the pump?

    With a 1 gallon tank, you are going to run the pump just about every time someone washes their hands, rinses out a glass, or puts a bit of water in the sink. Using that small a tank will probably increase the number of pump cycles in that kind of use, even with a CSV.
  6. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,486
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    With a 1 gallon tank of course the pump will have to come on every time you flush a toilet or wash your hands. For a seasonal cabin with limited water use that should not hurt anything. The CSV would keep the pump running continuously if you every run a sprinkler or while taking a shower so, the only cycling would be for intermittent use only. How many times a day you flush the toilet will also be about how many times the pump must cycle, and I do not think that will be a problem. Many people use the CSV with a 1 gallon tank for there everyday home use. While I don't really recommend this, these pump systems are lasting a long time. Therefore, the 1 Gallon tank for a seasonal use home is all that you need. Plus you will have constant pressure almost instantly when you open a faucet, and I know you will like that.
  7. 41Fever

    41Fever New Member

    Messages:
    23
    Location:
    North Dakota
    Thanks for the responses. Please tell me more about the Cycle stop valves. Where would it be located? Where do I get one? I have no idea as to what size my submersible pump is nor how deep the well is. It is 110 volts. It has been in the ground for 35+ years without any problems...yet. The pressure tank was located in the cabin and the well is probably 25 feet away.
  8. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,486
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
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