pH 6.1 after softening..how can I raise it ?

Discussion in 'Water Softener Forum, problems, installation and r' started by nofears, Feb 20, 2012.

  1. nofears

    nofears New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    California
    My home is fed by a private well. the pH of my well water is already fairly low in pH, 6.4. We have a water softener and just recently tested the water at our tap and the pH was 6.1. We have our water going thru an RO system before we drink it but it seems to taste a bit "metallicy" and seems to be a bit acidic (obvisouly why).

    I am wondering...is there any small device/filter/treatment/etc that I could deploy under my sink (next to my RO system) that would increase the pH of my water to more near 7 ?

    THanks for any help !
  2. mialynette2003

    mialynette2003 Member

    Messages:
    729
    Location:
    Ocala, Florida
    I have one in stock. It's called a Pentex GS_10 Cal/RO pH stabilizing filter. It has coconut shell carbon and calcite media. Service life says 2000 gals.
  3. 99k

    99k Radon Contractor and Water Treatment

    Messages:
    460
    Location:
    Fairfield Co.,Connecticut
    Are you using copper tubing after the RO system? You must use plastic tubing after any RO system since the water is very aggressive
  4. Hackney plumbing

    Hackney plumbing Homeowner

    Messages:
    1,174
    Location:
    Alabama
    That would last me about 2 weeks. OOPS,I see thats for only drinking. 2,000 gal filter should last quite a while.
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2012
  5. Akpsdvan

    Akpsdvan In the Trades

    Messages:
    1,480
    Location:
    Alaska
    If the whole house is copper and the ph is under 7, then treating a single faucet would be wrong. One has to treat the Whole House with either Soda Ash or calcite to bring the ph up to above 7 or get ready to replace copper pipes and repair drywall.
  6. Akpsdvan

    Akpsdvan In the Trades

    Messages:
    1,480
    Location:
    Alaska
    That 2k is on what kind of water?
    Also your box is full
  7. Superplum

    Superplum Licensed Plumber

    Messages:
    10
    Location:
    Putnam County, NY
    I think you should address the PH problem as a whole. Akpsdvan has the right idea. Low Ph can be a bigger problem then hardness. Didn't you get a water test before installing a softener? A softener won't raise the PH. If you don't have too high of a TDS (total dissolved solids) you can use a Calcite type of neutralizer. If the TDS is too high it will diminish the ability of the water to absorb the Calcite. Then you should use a chemical feed pump injecting a soda ash solution into a 40 gallon retention tank (preferably before the well tank). If you can use a calcite unit, which is lass troublesome (IMO) it would go after the well tank but before the softener. Make sure you order one with a dome plug to fill the Calcite. Believe it or not I have a competitor in my area who has installed at least 2 without the dome hole in the tank. I have to remove the entire head to add Neutralizer. A Master NS 20 combo unit would have been a great choice if you didn't already have a softener (depending on TDS).
  8. Smooky

    Smooky Member

    Messages:
    596
    Location:
    NC
    Why did you softened the water in the first place? Do you know what the water chemistry is before the softener? Usually to raise the pH you add hardness.
  9. ditttohead

    ditttohead Water systems designer, R&D

    Messages:
    1,813
    Location:
    Ontario California
    The majority of knowledgable people on this site respect eachothers ideas, experience, and opinions. When a mistake is made, the courteous correction is given, explained, and usually appreciated.

    Many people want to educate themselves on a subject prior to having somebody come in and try to oversell them a product that may or may not work. Not all water treatment problems are DIY. But asking questions, getting some knowledge from some highly experienced people who have a good reputation in the industry is always a good thing.

    Welcome Superplum, it is nice to have another perspective from an experienced tradesman.
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 16, 2012
  10. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    I've noticed that many of your posts seem to be directed at educating those people rather than the OP about their specific situation.

    My extensive experience in communicating with many people about that since 1992 when I started selling to DIYers is that many people without equipment call in 2-3 local dealers and don't like their mannerisms, prices, failure to explain why this'er that and frankly do not believe they are being told the truth, so they do not buy from them and then they get on the internet. Or... they call for service on their existing equipment and the service guys cause the homeowners' BS detector to alarm because the guy doesn't really want to fix it and proposes new equipment instead. Then they get on the internet and find a forum like this. Or he replaces a part or two and 2 weeks etc. later, the equipment isn't working again.

    You are correct about the overselling. There is no reason to do that and it's actually dumb to do it or anything else that upsets a prospective customer, it simply males the salesman's job harder. Prospecting for new customers is the hardest part of the sales job and the most costly part of doing business in both monetary expense and time. And if a customer buys at an inflated price and finds out they did, local guys have lost them forever or at least for a very long number of years.
  11. chevy427

    chevy427 Banned

    Messages:
    174
    Location:
    USA
    I agree. Your point of view, I am sure, is held by many.

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