Patching concrete floor after rough plumbing

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by ktambascio, Jul 16, 2009.

  1. ktambascio

    ktambascio Software Engineer

    Messages:
    28
    Location:
    Cleveland, OH
    Hi,

    I'm finishing up the rough plumbing for a basement bathroom. Looking at the hole I've created, I'm getting nervous about how/if I can patch this. I want to tile over top of this, so I want to make sure things are absolutely solid. A couple of suggestions from reading forum posts, google, and talking to a plumber friend:

    1. Fill hole with crushed rock. Then 1/2" drill horizontal through existing slab, and epoxy rebar, concrete over.

    2. Fill hole with crushed rock. 1/2" rebar pounded vertically into the ground, in a 6" grid pattern. Concrete over.

    I've attached some pictures of what I'm dealing with. Inspector has already taken a look at the DWV, and is happy with it. He wants 4" of concrete over top.

    -Kevin

    Attached Files:

  2. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,118
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2009
  3. ktambascio

    ktambascio Software Engineer

    Messages:
    28
    Location:
    Cleveland, OH
    If the wye's are horizontal, could backup then enter the vent more easily? I thought the wye had to be more vertical to prevent that, and always keep the air flowing...
  4. C NUMB

    C NUMB Plumbing Contractor

    Messages:
    135
    Location:
    NPR, FL
    "1. Fill hole with crushed rock. Then 1/2" drill horizontal through existing slab, and epoxy rebar, concrete over."

    That is what I would do.


    BTW, that whole plumbing rough in would fail here in Florida.
  5. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,118
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    The wyes would be rolled above the flow level.
    Inspectors don't like tees below grade on their backs.

    My inspectors would fail what you have.
    Any fitting below the flood level needs to be treated as a waste fitting, not a vent fitting.
  6. ktambascio

    ktambascio Software Engineer

    Messages:
    28
    Location:
    Cleveland, OH
    I'm struggling a bit here...but I found this picture from the B&D book that I have been using:

    http://books.google.com/books?id=8o...hMnfAw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=9

    If I'm understand everyone's comments...the below grade fittings need to be a waste-T, not a vent-T, right? I did use waste-T's, and the only difference I can spot is that I didn't use the long-radius waste-T's to transition the vent to vertical. Maybe the picture appears that I used the vent-T, but that is not the case.

    Any pics you can show would be appreciated...I'm just trying to fully understand the comments.

    Regards,
    Kevin
  7. ktambascio

    ktambascio Software Engineer

    Messages:
    28
    Location:
    Cleveland, OH
  8. C NUMB

    C NUMB Plumbing Contractor

    Messages:
    135
    Location:
    NPR, FL
    I see you are from Ohio, and that is how its done there from what I remember, besides you said an inspector is happy with it.

    I was hired back in the winter of '85 to finish a Motel 6 in Dayton, it was a learning experience I'll never forget. It took the 4 of us a week to figure out what all the stacks coming up though the slab were for. Every fixture there was dry vented.

    BTW, I remember we had to plug off all vents and put a test ball down the 6" clean out towards the sewer tap, put enough water into the clean out to give a water seal in the clean out. Then use this devise to put air into the entire waste system and hold a 1" column of water for 30 minutes in order to get our final inspection, Do they still make plumbers do that test???
  9. C NUMB

    C NUMB Plumbing Contractor

    Messages:
    135
    Location:
    NPR, FL
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2009
  10. ktambascio

    ktambascio Software Engineer

    Messages:
    28
    Location:
    Cleveland, OH
    C NUMB,

    I was just reading this post that if it's a dry vent system, you can use a sanitary T on it's back. If its a wet-vent, there's no way you can do that because of the sharp bends. The vent system is dry...there will be a connection to my existing house stack 42" + 6" + couple more for extra insurance above the floor, and so this new basement bathroom will have it's own dry vent system.

    I also saw your post on the trap primer. I have never heard of those, but the idea makes sense. Inspector didn't say anything when I specifically told him I replaced the old clay floor drain/p-trap with the new PVC floor drain/p-trap.

    Thanks,
    Kevin
  11. FloridaOrange

    FloridaOrange Plumbing Designer

    Messages:
    1,317
    Location:
    SW Florida
    Trap primers aren't required in all areas. For the little amount of $ and time to install I wouldn't go without one. I tend to spec PPP inc. primer valves if that helps.

    For home use if you don't want to use a valve you could use something like this: PPP Tailpiece Trap Primer
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