Ozone Generator

Discussion in 'Remodel Forum & Blog' started by North Jersey, Jun 17, 2009.

  1. North Jersey

    North Jersey New Member

    Messages:
    107
    What has been your experience with ozone generators for mold and "household" odors? Would output of 16 grams/hour be sufficient to deoderize a basement? I'm considering buying one of these:
    http://www.maxblasterusa.com/
  2. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    Despite the claims, 16 mg per hour ozone is bubkus. It may be a little more that should be present if humans are in the area. But for truly treating mold, smoke odor, etc. you need something in the neighbor hood of 3 to 6 mg per hour PER SQUARE FOOT of area, and at that level, humans must NOT be in the area until after treating for a few hours, then opening to ventilation. Check this website: www.queenaire.com for a lot of good info on ozone odor control. Their machines output in the range of 300 to 1800 mg per hour.
  3. North Jersey

    North Jersey New Member

    Messages:
    107
    Yeah, the one in question is actually 16,000 mg/hour. I guess that should be sufficient for my purposes. I'll check out the queenaire site. I understand you need to keep the house vacant for at least an hour after you shut off the machine. Have you had any first hand success with ozone?
  4. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    I have dealt with hotels who want to convert former smoking rooms to non-smoking. Success is variable. This is a very difficult task. They usually replace the drapes and carpet, and paint the ceiling. It is still a tough go, and the solution is usually a combination of ozone and old spice!
  5. North Jersey

    North Jersey New Member

    Messages:
    107
    Do you think it's worth a go? I have all these fantasies of using the machine to deoderize shoes, cars, . . . my kids . . . :)
  6. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,153
    Location:
    New England
    Think about what ozone really is: a highly reactive oxygen molecule. Oxygen in this form can act like a bleach...it attaches itself to other molecules and changes their chemical formulation. Unreacting molecules eventually degrade to more common O2 that we need for respiration. In high concentrations, it can tear some molecules apart, so what's left just isn't the same. Have enough of it, and you can make a very visible change, if the stuff is susceptable to reacting with the ozone. Not everything is.
  7. North Jersey

    North Jersey New Member

    Messages:
    107
    The whole concept is glorious. I need something that will permeate cracks and crevices. I'll be going over the basement with bleach before I run the machine. I'll post my results with the $400 machine after I'm done with the project.
  8. Agu

    Agu New Member

    Messages:
    66
    Location:
    Tampa, FL
    Had a van seat in the garage that a neighborhood tomcat decided to mark as his territory. As anyone who's smelled it can attest, male cat urine is nasty smelling stuff. My friend at Servicemaster said he could tent the bench seat and use an ozonizer to chemically neutralize the smell. It appeared to work, we reinstalled the bench seat in the van and three weeks later when we sold the van there was still no odor.

    We packed up and left town a few days later so I can't vouch for it's effectiveness after about four weeks ;).
  9. North Jersey

    North Jersey New Member

    Messages:
    107
    Wow! That's impressive. I am very familiar with the tomcat's musk.

    This is what I ended up buying:
    http://www.maxblasterusa.com/index.html

    I'm going to use it in addition to my EBAC BD150 industrial dehumidifierhttp://www.ebacusa.com/bd150.htm to make my basement habitable again.

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